Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Delayed differentiation of vaginal and uterine microbiomes in dairy cows developing postpartum endometritis
    Bacterial overgrowth in the uterus is a normal event after parturition. In contrast to the healthy cow, animals unable to control the infection within 21 days after calving develop postpartum endometritis. Studies on the Microbial Ecology of the bovine reproductive tract have focused on either vaginal or uterine microbiomes. This is the first study that compares both microbiomes in the same animals. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism of the 16S rRNA gene showed that despite large differences associated to individuals, a shared community exist in vagina and uterus during the postpartum period. The largest changes associated with development of endometritis were observed at 7 days postpartum, a time when vaginal and uterine microbiomes were most similar. 16S rRNA pyrosequencing of the vaginal microbiome at 7 days postpartum showed at least three different microbiome types that were associated with later development of postpartum endometritis. All three microbiome types featured reduced bacterial diversity. Taken together, the above findings support a scenario where disruption of the compartmentalization of the reproductive tract during parturition results in the dispersal and mixing of the vaginal and uterine microbiomes, which subsequently are subject to differentiation. This differentiation was observed early postpartum in the healthy cow. In contrast, loss of bacterial diversity and dominance of the microbiome by few bacterial taxa were related to a delayed succession at 7DPP in cows that at 21 DPP or later were diagnosed with endometritis.
      291Scopus© Citations 30
  • Publication
    BINDER: computationally inferring a gene regulatory network for Mycobacterium abscessus
    Background: Although many of the genic features in Mycobacterium abscessus have been fully validated, a comprehensive understanding of the regulatory elements remains lacking. Moreover, there is little understanding of how the organism regulates its transcriptomic profile, enabling cells to survive in hostile environments. Here, to computationally infer the gene regulatory network for Mycobacterium abscessus we propose a novel statistical computational modelling approach: BayesIan gene regulatory Networks inferreD via gene coExpression and compaRative genomics (BINDER). In tandem with derived experimental coexpression data, the property of genomic conservation is exploited to probabilistically infer a gene regulatory network in Mycobacterium abscessus.Inference on regulatory interactions is conducted by combining ‘primary’ and ‘auxiliary’ data strata. The data forming the primary and auxiliary strata are derived from RNA-seq experiments and sequence information in the primary organism Mycobacterium abscessus as well as ChIP-seq data extracted from a related proxy organism Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The primary and auxiliary data are combined in a hierarchical Bayesian framework, informing the apposite bivariate likelihood function and prior distributions respectively. The inferred relationships provide insight to regulon groupings in Mycobacterium abscessus. Results: We implement BINDER on data relating to a collection of 167,280 regulator-target pairs resulting in the identification of 54 regulator-target pairs, across 5 transcription factors, for which there is strong probability of regulatory interaction. Conclusions: The inferred regulatory interactions provide insight to, and a valuable resource for further studies of, transcriptional control in Mycobacterium abscessus, and in the family of Mycobacteriaceae more generally. Further, the developed BINDER framework has broad applicability, useable in settings where computational inference of a gene regulatory network requires integration of data sources derived from both the primary organism of interest and from related proxy organisms.
      212Scopus© Citations 4