Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Minimising transmission reactive support required by high penetration of distributed wind power generation
    Wind power generation is the fastest growing renewable technology worldwide with large on- and off-shore wind farms being connected to the transmission networks. A significant share of it is, however, still being deployed at distribution levels. While distributed wind generation presents traditionally passive distribution networks with well-established technical challenges, reactive support needed by high penetrations of such new generation capacity might also have an impact on the weak areas of the transmission grid. In this work, a multi-period AC optimal power flow-based technique is proposed to find power factor and substation settings that minimise the transmission reactive support required by variable distributed generation while also considering N-1 contingencies. A section of Irish distribution network is analysed. Results show the significant benefits that a passive approach such as the use of optimal power factor and substation settings can achieve.
      303
  • Publication
    Optimal voltage control settings for wind power
    (Institution of Engineering and Technology, 2009) ; ; ;
    High penetrations of wind power on distribution networks are causing voltage rise on many networks. This voltage rise is limiting the permissible penetration levels of wind. Numerous active control schemes have been proposed to solve this issue, but widespread adoption of active management by network operators has yet to occur. Here, the fixed power factors of the generators' and the tap setting of the transmission transformer are optimally determined such that the voltage rise barrier is overcome and more wind can connect. The impact on the transmission system is becoming increasingly important and is also taken account of in the method. The method is tested on a sample section of distribution network illustrating that the optimal selection of voltage control settings can deliver some of the benefits of active management without any of the expense or perceived risk.
      487Scopus© Citations 5
  • Publication
    Enhanced utilization of voltage control resources with distributed generation
    Distributed Generation (DG) is increasing in penetration on power systems across the world. In rural areas, voltage rise limits the permissible penetration levels of DG. Another increasingly important issue is the impact on transmission system voltages of DG reactive power demand. Here, a passive solution is proposed to reduce the impact on the transmission system voltages and overcome the distribution voltage rise barrier such that more DG can connect. The fixed power factors of the generators and the tap setting of the transmission transformer are determined by a linear programming formulation. The method is tested on a sample section of radial distribution network and on a model of the all island Irish transmission system illustrating that enhanced passive utilisation of voltage control resources can deliver many of the benefits of active management without any of the expense or perceived risk, while also satisfying the conflicting objectives of the transmission system operator.
      1284Scopus© Citations 170
  • Publication
    Minimising transmission reactive support required by high penetration of distributed wind power distribution
    Wind power generation is the fastest growing renewable technology worldwide with large on- and off-shore wind farms being connected to the transmission networks. A significant share of it, however is still being deployed at distribution levels. While distributed wind generation presents traditionally passive distribution networks with well-established technical challenges, reactive support needed by high penetrations of such new generation capacity might also have an impact on the week areas of the transmission grid. In this work, a multi-period AC optimal power flow-based technique is proposed to find power factor and substation settings that minimise the transmission reactive support required by variable distributed generation while also considering N-1 contingencies. A section of Irish distribution network is analysed. Results show the significant benefits that a passive approach such as the use of optimal power factor and substation settings can achieve.
      270Scopus© Citations 72