Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Intestinal Permeation Enhancers for Oral Delivery of Macromolecules: A Comparison between Salcaprozate Sodium (SNAC) and Sodium Caprate (C10)
    Salcaprozate sodium (SNAC) and sodium caprate (C10) are two of the most advanced intestinal permeation enhancers (PEs) that have been tested in clinical trials for oral delivery of macromolecules. Their effects on intestinal epithelia were studied for over 30 years, yet there is still debate over their mechanisms of action. C10 acts via openings of epithelial tight junctions and/or membrane perturbation, while for decades SNAC was thought to increase passive transcellular permeation across small intestinal epithelia based on increased lipophilicity arising from non-covalent macromolecule complexation. More recently, an additional mechanism for SNAC associated with a pH-elevating, monomer-inducing, and pepsin-inhibiting effect in the stomach for oral delivery of semaglutide was advocated. Comparing the two surfactants, we found equivocal evidence for discrete mechanisms at the level of epithelial interactions in the small intestine, especially at the high doses used in vivo. Evidence that one agent is more efficacious compared to the other is not convincing, with tablets containing these PEs inducing single-digit highly variable increases in oral bioavailability of payloads in human trials, although this may be adequate for potent macromolecules. Regarding safety, SNAC has generally regarded as safe (GRAS) status and is Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved as a medical food (Eligen®-Vitamin B12, Emisphere, Roseland, NJ, USA), whereas C10 has a long history of use in man, and has food additive status. Evidence for co-absorption of microorganisms in the presence of either SNAC or C10 has not emerged from clinical trials to date, and long-term effects from repeat dosing beyond six months have yet to be assessed. Since there are no obvious scientific reasons to prefer SNAC over C10 in orally delivering a poorly permeable macromolecule, then formulation, manufacturing, and commercial considerations are the key drivers in decision-making.
      584Scopus© Citations 141
  • Publication
    Labrasol® and Salts of Medium-chain Fatty Acids Can Be Combined in Low Concentrations to Increase the Permeability of a Macromolecule Marker Across Isolated Rat Intestinal Mucosae
    In addition to their solubilizing properties, excipients used in lipid-based formulations can improve intestinal permeability of macromolecules. We determined whether admixing of medium-chain fatty acid (MCFA) permeation enhancers with a lipoidal excipient (Labrasol®) could potentiate transepithelial flux of a poorly permeable macromolecule (fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 4 kDa [FD4]) across rat intestinal mucosae mounted in Ussing chambers. Low concentrations of sodium caprate (C10), sodium undecylenate (C11:1), or sodium laurate (C12) combined with Labrasol® increased the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of FD4 to values typically seen with higher concentrations of MCFAs or Labrasol® alone. For example, combination of C11:1 (0.5 mg/mL) with Labrasol® (1 mg/mL) increased the Papp of FD4 by 10- and 11-fold over the respective individual agents at the same concentrations where no enhancement was evident. The increased enhancement ratios seen with the combinations were associated with some perturbation in intestinal histology and with attenuation of an epithelial functional measure, carbachol-stimulated inward short-circuit current. In conclusion, combining three MCFAs separately with Labrasol® increased the Papp of FD4 to values greater than those seen for MCFAs or Labrasol® alone. Ultimately, this may permit lower concentrations of MCFA to be used in combination with other excipients in oral formulations of poorly permeable molecules.
      609Scopus© Citations 19