Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Low Dose of Amino-Modified Nanoparticles Induces Cell Cycle Arrest
    The interaction of nanoscaled materials with biological systems is currently the focus of a fast-growing area of investigation. Though many nanoparticles interact with cells without acute toxic responses, amino-modified polystyrene nanoparticles are known to induce cell death. We have found that by lowering their dose, cell death remains low for several days while, interestingly, cell cycle progression is arrested. In this scenario, nanoparticle uptake, which we have recently shown to be affected by cell cycle progression, develops differently over time due to the absence of cell division. This suggests that the same nanoparticles can trigger different pathways depending on exposure conditions and the dose accumulated.
      485Scopus© Citations 77
  • Publication
    Role of cell cycle on the cellular uptake and dilution of nanoparticles in a cell population
    Nanoparticles are considered a primary vehicle for targeted therapies because they can pass biological barriers, enter and distribute in cells by energy-dependent pathways1-3. Until now, most studies have shown that nanoparticle properties, such as size4-6 and surface7,8, can affect how cells internalise nanoparticles. Here we show that the different phases of cell growth, which constitute the cell cycle, can also influence nanoparticle uptake. Although cells in different cell cycle phases internalised nanoparticles with similar rates, after 24 hours of uptake the concentration of nanoparticles in the cells is ranked according to the different cell cycle phases: G2/M > S > G0/G1. Nanoparticles were not exported from cells but the internalised nanoparticle concentration is split when the cell divides. Our results suggest that future studies on nanoparticle uptake should consider the cell cycle because in a cell population, the internalised nanoparticle dose in each cell varies as the cell cycles.
      5457Scopus© Citations 482
  • Publication
    Theoretical framework for nanoparticle uptake and accumulation kinetics in dividing cell populations
    Nano-sized objects interact with biological systems in fundamentally novel ways, thereby holding great promise for targeted drug delivery. It has also been suggested they could constitute a hitherto unseen hazard. Numerous experimental studies in the field are taking place. We consider that the nature of the interactions allows a more fundamental theoretical framework to be developed. In particular, we describe the intimate link that develops between nanoparticle uptake and cell population evolution. Explicit analytical results are given and the theory compared to experimental observations.
      380Scopus© Citations 28