Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Medication-assisted treatment for youth with opioid use disorder: Current dilemmas and remaining questions
    (Taylor & Francis, 2017-11-30) ; ; ;
    The prevalence of risky opioid use, opioid use disorder, and related harms continue to rise among youth (adolescents and young adults age 15-25) in North America. With an increasing number of opioid overdoses, there remain significant barriers to care for youth with opioid use disorder, and there is an urgent need to expand evidence-based care for treatment of opioid use disorder among this population. Based on the extensive literature on treatment of opioid use disorder among adults, medicated-assisted treatment is likely to be an important or even essential component of treatment of opioid use disorder for most youth. In this article, we outline the current dilemmas and questions regarding the use of medication-assisted treatment among youth with opioid use disorder and propose some potential solutions based on the current evidence.
      288Scopus© Citations 30
  • Publication
    A Case of Opioid Overdose and Subsequent Death After Medically Supervised Withdrawal: The Problematic Role of Rapid Tapers for Opioid Use Disorder
    BACKGROUND: Relapse to opioid use is common after rapid opioid withdrawal. As a result, short-term tapers of opioid agonist/partial agonist medications, such as methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone, are no longer recommended by recent clinical care guidelines for the management of opioid use disorder. Nonetheless, rapid tapers are still commonplace in medically supervised withdrawal settings.CASE SUMMARY: We report a case of an individual with opioid use disorder who was prescribed a rapid buprenorphine/naloxone taper in a medically supervised withdrawal facility and who had a subsequent opioid overdose and death after discharge. DISCUSSION:The fatal outcome in this case study underscores the potential severe harms associated with use of rapid tapers. Given the increased overdose risk, tapers should be avoided and continuing care strategies, such as maintenance pharmacotherapy, should be initiated in medically supervised withdrawal settings.
      201Scopus© Citations 12