Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    What are the mechanisms that enable the reciprocal involvement of seldom heard groups in health and social care research? A rapid realist review protocol
    Background: The University College Dublin (UCD) PPI Ignite Connect Network will fundamentally embed public and patient involvement (PPI) in health-related research, education and training, professional practice and administration in UCD’s institutional structures and procedures. A significant focus of the programme of work is on actively engaging and developing long-term reciprocal relationships with seldom heard groups, via our ten inaugural partners. Methods: This rapid realist review will explore what are the mechanisms that are important in actively engaging seldom heard groups in health and social care research. The review process will follow five iterative steps: (1) clarify scope, (2) search for evidence, (3) appraise primary studies and extract data, (4) synthesise evidence and draw conclusions, and (5) disseminate findings. The reviewers will consult with expert and reference panels to focus the review, provide local contextual insights and develop a programme theory consisting of context–mechanism–outcome configurations. The expert panel will oversee the review process and agree, via consensus, the final programme theory. Review findings will follow the adopted RAMESES guideline and will be disseminated via a report, presentations and peer-reviewed publication. Discussion: The review will update and consolidate evidence on the mechanisms that enable the reciprocal engagement and participation of ‘seldom heard’ groups in health and social care research. Via the expert and reference process, we will draw from a sizeable body of published and unpublished research and grey literature. The local contextual insights provided will aid the development of our programme theories. This new evidence will inform the design and development of the UCD PPI Ignite program focused on ensuring sustained reciprocal partnerships.
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  • Publication
    Using reusable learning objects (rlos) in wound care education: undergraduate student nurse's evaluation of their learning gain
    Background: Both nationally and internationally concerns have been expressed over the adequacy of preparation of undergraduate nurses for the clinical skill of wound care. This project describes the educational evaluation of a series of Reusable Learning Objects (RLOs) as a blended learning approach to facilitate undergraduate nursing students learning of wound care for competence development. Constructivism Learning Theory and Cognitive Theory of Multimedia Learning informed the design of the RLOs, promoting active learner approaches. Clinically based case studies and visual data from two large university teaching hospitals provided the authentic learning materials required. Interactive exercises and formative feedback were incorporated into the educational resource. Methods: Evaluation of student perceived learning gains in terms of knowledge, ability and attitudes were measured using a quantitative pre and posttest Wound Care Competency Outcomes Questionnaire. The RLO CETL Questionnaire was used to identify perceived learning enablers. Statistical and deductive thematic analyses inform the findings. Results: Students (n=192) reported that their ability to meet the competency outcomes for wound care had increased significantly after engaging with the RLOs. Students rated the RLOs highly across all categories of perceived usefulness, impact, access and integration. Conclusion: These findings provide evidence that the use of RLOs for both knowledge-based and performance-based learning is effective. RLOs when designed using clinically real case scenarios reflect the true complexities of wound care and offer innovative interventions in nursing curricula.
      551Scopus© Citations 24
  • Publication
    Teaching and learning in the biosciences: the development of an educational programme to assist student nurses in their assessment and management of patients with wounds
    Aims and objectives: The aim of this project was to develop an educational package for undergraduate student nurses that would provide them with the theoretical knowledge and clinical judgement skills to care for a patient with a wound. Background: Internationally there is concern over the adequacy of preparation of undergraduate nurses for the clinical skill of wound care. Deficits have also been identified in the underpinning biological sciences needed for this skill. Expectations associated with wound management have altered significantly in the last two decades with decision making around wound care coming under the scope of practice of nurses. The treatment and care options for patients with wounds must be based on a sound knowledge of how wounds are formed and healed. If nurses do not have the evidence-based knowledge, it can affect wound healing adversely leading to increased patient suffering, pain and delayed healing. From an organisational perspective, delayed healing will increase the cost of care. Design: This project used constructivism learning theory to provide a framework for the development of a wound care educational package for undergraduate Irish nurses in their penultimate year of training. Methods: Collaboration was formed with key stake holders. Pertinent curriculum content was mapped. Learning strategies to suit the incoming student learning styles were incorporated into newly developed theoretical content and practical skill sessions. Conclusion: The developed educational programme will assist student nurses in their care of patients with wounds. Relevance to clinical practice: This study provides a model that can be followed to develop small units of the study to keep abreast of changes in health care delivery and the changing scope of practice of nurses. It also contributes to the debate on the teaching and learning of biosciences as it highlights the depth of biological knowledge required as a basis for good evidence-based nursing care.
      562Scopus© Citations 8
  • Publication
    “What Bothers Me Most Is the Disparity between the Choices that People Have or Don’t Have”: A Qualitative Study on the Health Systems Responsiveness to Implementing the Assisted Decision-Making (Capacity) Act in Ireland
    Objective: The Assisted Decision-Making (ADM) (Capacity) Act was enacted in 2015 inIreland and will be commenced in 2021. This paper is focused on this pre-implementation stage withinthe acute setting and uses a health systems responsiveness framework. Methods: We conductedface-to-face interviews using a critical incident technique. We interviewed older people includingthose with a diagnosis of dementia (n=8), family carers (n=5) and health and social care professionals(HSCPs) working in the acute setting (n=26). Results: The interviewees reflected upon a healthcaresystem that is currently under significant pressures. HSCPs are doing their best, but they are oftenhalted from delivering on the will and preference of their patients. Many older people and familycarers feel that they must be very assertive to have their preferences considered. All expressedconcern about the strain on the healthcare system. There are significant environmental barriers thatare hindering ADM practice. Conclusions: The commencement of ADM provides an opportunityto redefine the provision, practices, and priorities of healthcare in Ireland to enable improvedpatient-centred care. To facilitate implementation of ADM, it is therefore critical to identify andprovide adequate resources and work towards solutions to ensure a seamless commencement ofthe legislation.>
      108Scopus© Citations 9
  • Publication
    Evaluation of a national training programme to support engagement in mental health services: Learning enablers and learning gains
    INTRODUCTION: The Irish national mental health service provider commissioned a national training programme to support a patient and public involvement (PPI) initiative in mental health services. The programme evaluation afforded an opportunity to describe the learning gains and learning enablers and the factors that support PPI in mental health. AIM: We aimed to evaluate a PPI training programme across nine regional administrative units in a national mental health service. METHODS: We conducted a participant exit survey, using the Student Assessment of Learning Gains (SALG) instrument. We analysed the survey responses using SPSS version 24 software and applied directed content analysis to the narrative comments provided in open-ended questions. RESULTS: A total of 54 participants returned the completed questionnaire, yielding a response rate of 60 per cent. The overall mean SALG score yielded was 3.97 (SD 0.66; range 1-5), indicating that participants reported very good to excellent gains in their learning from the programme. Participants who offered narrative comments indicated an overall positive experience but suggested that all stakeholders should work together to co-produce the training. DISCUSSION: All the stakeholders in a PPI training initiative to support the engagement of service users, their families and carers in mental health, should work together to achieve their desired outcome. This requires co-production in the design, delivery and evaluation of the training initiative, and co-production can impact at both individual and local levels. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: PPI training initiatives in mental health should retain a focus on understanding conflict resolution, committee effectiveness, interpersonal and facilitation skills. Ensuring a shared understanding of key concepts, such as co-production, is a necessary prerequisite at the co-commissioning, co-design, co-planning, co-delivery and co-assessment stages of programme development As is the need to avoid artificial or actual distinctions between health professionals and those who are non-professionals, such as the service users.
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