Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    Biomolecules as Model Indicators of In Vitro and In Vivo Cold Plasma Safety
    The potential applications for cold plasma in medicine are extensive, from microbial inactivation and induction of apoptosis in cancer cells to stimulating wound healing and enhancing the blood coagulation cascade. The safe bio-medical application of cold plasma and subsequent effect on complex biological pathways requires precision and a distinct understanding of how physiological redox chemistry is manipulated. Chemical modification of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids treated with cold plasma have been characterized, however, the context of how alterations of these molecules affect cell behavior or in vivo functionality has not been determined. Thus, this study examines the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of plasma-treated molecules in vitro using CHO-K1 cells and in vivo in Galleria mellonella larvae. Specifically, albumin, glucose, cholesterol, and arachidonic acid were chosen as representative biomolecules, with established involvement in diverse bioprocesses including; cellular respiration, intracellular transport, cell signaling or membrane structure. Long- and short-term effects depended strongly on the molecule type and the treatment milieu indicating the impact of chemical and physical modifications on downstream biological pathways. Importantly, absence of short-term toxicity did not always correlate with absence of longer-term effects, indicating the need to comprehensively assess ongoing effects for diverse biological applications.
      56Scopus© Citations 1
  • Publication
    Controlling microbial safety challenges of meat using high voltage atmospheric cold plasma
    Atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) is a non-thermal technology, effective against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Inactivation efficacy results from plasma generated reactive species. These may interact with any organic components in a test matrix including the target microorganism, thus food components may exert a protective effect against the antimicrobial mode of action. The effect of an in-package high voltage ACP process applied in conjunction with common meat processing MAP gas compositions as well as bacteria type and meat model media composition have been investigated to determine the applicability of this technology for decontamination of safety challenges associated with meat products. E. coli, L. monocytogenes, and S. aureus in PBS were undetectable after 60 s of treatment at 80 kVRMS in air, while ACP treatment of the contaminated meat model required post-treatment refrigeration to retain antimicrobial effect. The nutritive components in the meat model exerted a protective effect during treatment, where 300 s ACP exposure yielded a maximum reduction of 1.5 log using a high oxygen atmosphere, whilst using air and high nitrogen atmospheres yielded lower antimicrobial efficacy. Furthermore, an ROS assay was performed to understand the protective effects observed using the meat model. This revealed that nutritive components inhibited penetration of ROS into bacterial cells. This knowledge can assist the optimization of meat decontamination using ACP technology where interactions with all components of the food matrix require evaluation.
      42Scopus© Citations 42
  • Publication
    Cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of solutions exposed to cold atmospheric plasma
    The exposure of aqueous solutions to atmospheric plasmas results in the generation of relatively long-lived secondary products such as hydrogen peroxide which are biologically active and have demonstrated anti-microbial and cytotoxic activity. The use of plasma-activated solutions in applications such as microbial decontamination or anti-cancer treatments requires not only adequate performance on target cells but also a safe operating window regarding the impact on surrounding tissues. Furthermore the generation of plasma-activated fluids needs to be considered as a by-stander effect of subjecting tissue to plasma discharges. Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity assays using mammalian cell lines were used to elucidate the effects of solutions treated with di-electric barrier discharge atmospheric cold plasma. Plasma-treated PBS inhibited cell growth in a treatment time-dependent manner showing a linear correlation to the solutions' peroxide concentration which remained stable over several weeks. Plasma-treated foetal bovine serum (FBS) acting as a model for complex bio-fluids showed not only cytotoxic effects but also exhibited increased mutagenic potential as determined using the mammalian HPRT assay. Further studies are warranted to determine the nature, causes and effects of the cyto- and genotoxic potential of solutions exposed to plasma discharges to ensure long-term safety of novel plasma applications in medicine and healthcare.
      44Scopus© Citations 105
  • Publication
    Safety evaluation of plasma-treated lettuce broth using in vitro and in vivo toxicity models
    Cold atmospheric plasma is a promising new non-thermal technology for improving the microbiological safety and shelf-life of food products, particularly fresh produce and minimally processed fruit and vegetables. Limited research has been conducted on the safety of plasma-treated foods for human or animal consumption. This study focuses on basic safety studies by investigating lettuce broth treated with a di-electric barrier discharge plasma device as a fresh produce model in terms of in vitro cytotoxic and mutagenic effects on mammalian cells and its in vivo toxicity on Galleria mellonella larvae. Low cytotoxic effects were detected in vitro and mutagenic events were likely to be spontaneous mutations. However, a strong response of G. mellonella larvae to injection with plasma-treated lettuce broth was observed for 5-min-treated broth, with larvae survival of less than 10%. No significant effects on quality attributes such as colour were detected and only low concentrations of peroxide were generated in the broth. This study highlights the need for more detailed investigations into the impact of plasma treatment on food components and the subsequent in vitro and in vivo effects to ensure safe implementation of plasma technology for the processing of food products.
      78Scopus© Citations 7
  • Publication
    Corrigendum: Biomolecules as Model Indicators of In Vitro and In Vivo Cold Plasma Safety
    In the original article, the reference for [16] was incorrectly written as “Khlyustova A, Jarzina F, Brinckmann S. Important parameters in plasma jets for the production of RONS in liquids for plasma medicine: a brief review. Front Chem Sci Eng (2019) 13:238–52. doi: 10.1007/s11705-019- 1801-8.” This should be “Khlyustova A, Labay C, Machala Z, Ginebra MP, Canal C. Important parameters in plasma jets for the production of RONS in liquids for plasma medicine: a brief review. Front Chem Sci Eng (2019) 13:238–52. doi: 10.1007/s11705-019-1801-8.” Further, the reference for [17] was incorrectly written as “Labay C, Shimizu T, Thomas HM, Morfill GE. Enhanced generation of reactive species by cold plasma in gelatin solutions for selective cancer cell death. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (2020) 12(42):47256–69. doi: 10.1021/acsami.0c12930.” This should be “Labay, C, Roldán, M, Tampieri, F, Stancampiano, A, Escot Bocanegra, P, Ginebra, MP, Canal, C. Enhanced generation of reactive species by cold plasma in gelatin solutions for selective cancer cell death. ACS Appl Mater Interfaces (2020) 12(42):47256–69. doi: 10.1021/acsami.0c12930.” The authors apologize for these errors and state that this does not change the scientific conclusions of the article in any way. The original article has been updated.
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