Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    An Investigation of the psychosocial impact of a compensation tribunal on women with an iatrogenic Hepatitis C infection
    (Irish Medical Organization, 2003-03) ; ; ;
    The aim of this study was to investigate the psychosocial impact of a Compensation Tribunal in women with an iatrogenic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Eighty-three women diagnosed with an iatrogenic HCV infection were recruited, 19 women were Pre-Tribunal and 64 women were post-Tribunal. Both standardised and disease specific psychological measures were used. A series of t-tests revealed no differences in psychological well-being and adjustment to HCV infection in women pre and post Compensation Tribunal. Chi-square tests revealed no association between PCR status and 1) psychological well-being and 2) experience of anger/blame in women post- Compensation Tribunal. A further series of t-tests revealed that women with high levels of anger and blame post-Compensation Tribunal perceived their future as more uncertain, experienced more pain, low self-esteem and psychological distress, viewed their ability to work as impeded and complained of increased stress preparing for their Compensation Tribunal. This study suggests that poor adjustment in women with an iatrogenic HCV infection post-Compensation Tribunal is not associated with attendance at a Compensation Tribunal nor PCR status but rather to experiences of anger and blame.
      314
  • Publication
    The Role of a Neuropsychiatry Clinic in a Tertiary Referral Teaching Hospital: A Two-Year Study
    Objectives: Mental disorder is common among individuals with neurological illness. We aimed to characterise the patient population referred for psychiatry assessment at a tertiary neurology service in terms of neurological and psychiatric diagnoses and interventions provided. Methods: We studied all individuals referred for psychiatry assessment at a tertiary neurology service over a 2-year period (n= 82). Results: The most common neurological diagnoses among those referred were epilepsy (16%), Parkinson’s disease (15%) and multiple sclerosis (8%). The most common reasons for psychiatric assessment were low mood or anxiety (48%) and medically unexplained symptoms or apparent functional or psychogenic disease (21%). The most common diagnoses among those with mental disorder were mood disorders (62%), and neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders, including dissociative (conversion) disorders (28%). Psychiatric diagnosis was not related to gender, neurological diagnosis or psychiatric history. Conclusion: Individuals with neurological illness demonstrate significant symptoms of a range of mental disorders. There is a need for further research into the characteristics and distribution of mental disorder in individuals with neurological illness, and for the enhancement of integrated psychiatric and neurological services to address the comorbidities demonstrated in this population.
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