Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    A dialectical approach to information retrieval
    Purpose:The paper explores the question of whether the often paradoxical and conceptually contradictory discipline of information retrieval (IR) can be understood more clearly when it is analysed from a dialectical perspective. Methodology/Approach:Conceptual analysis and literature review. Findings:A dialectical understanding of meaning can assist in clarifying some aspects of the complex nature of current IR theory. Research Implications:Philosophy has the potential to explore the conflicts and contradictions in IR and should not be used just as a means of synthesis and resolution. The use of the philosophy of meaning should include a broader understanding of the philosophical oppositions which lie behind the nature of meaning. Originality/value of paper:This paper suggests a new perspective on the role of meaning in IR: the dialectical model.
      364Scopus© Citations 11
  • Publication
    Do RFIDs (radio frequency identifier devices) provide new ethical dilemmas for librarians and information professionals?
    Abstract: This paper provides an analysis of the current and potential ethical implications of RFID technology for the library and information professions. These issues are analysed as a series of ethical dilemmas, or hard-to-resolve competing ethical obligations, which the librarian has in relationship to information objects, library users and the wider social and political environment or state. A process model of the library is used as a framework for the discussion to illustrate the relationship between the different participants in the library system and it is argued that ethical analysis should involve the identification of future developments as well as current issues. The analysis shows that RFIDs do currently pose some dilemmas for librarians in terms of the conflicts between efficient service, privacy of users and an obligation to protect the safety of society as a whole, and that these are likely to become more problematic as the technology develops. This paper is part 2 of a series of papers on RFIDs and the library and information professions.
      4912Scopus© Citations 17
  • Publication
    Meaning in philosophy and meaning in information retrieval (IR)
    Purpose -The paper explores the question of whether the differences between meaning in philosophy and meaning in information retrieval (IR) have implications for the use of philosophy in supporting research in IR. Design/methodology/approach - Conceptual analysis and literature review. Findings - There are some differences in the role of meaning in terms of purpose, content and use which should be clarified in order to assist a productive relationship between the philosophy of language and IR. Research Implications -This provides some new theoretical insights into the philosophical context of IR. It suggests that further productive work on the central concepts within IR could be achieved through the use of a methodology which analyses how exactly these concepts are discussed in other disciplines and the implications of any differences in the way in which they may operate in IR. Originality/value - This paper suggests a new perspective on the relationship between philosophy and IR by exploring the role of meaning in these respective disciplines and highlighting differences, as well as similarities, with particular reference to the role of information as well as meaning in IR. This contributes to an understanding of two of the central concepts in IR, meaning and information, and the ways in which they are related. There is a history of work in IR and information science (IS) examining dilemmas (Neill, 1987; Ellis, 1992, 1996) and this paper builds on this work by relating it to some similar dilemmas in philosophy. Thus it develops the theory and conceptual understanding of IR by suggesting that philosophy could be used as a way of exploring intractable dilemmas in IR.
      788Scopus© Citations 9
  • Publication
    The application of RFIDs in libraries : an assessment of technological, management and professional issues
    This paper starts by outlining the technologies involved in RFIDs and reviews the issues raised by their general application. It then identifies their potential application areas within the library sector based on a generic process view of library activities. Finally it highlights the issues that are raised by their application in libraries and provides an assessment of which of these issues are likely to raise ethical concerns for library professionals. The purpose is to provide an overview of the technology within the context of the library process and to highlight issues which may raise ethical concerns for the profession. A second paper will focus specifically on these concerns within the context of the professional obligations of the librarian.
      706Scopus© Citations 22
  • Publication
    How do libraries manage the ethical and privacy issues of RFID implementation? A qualitative investigation into the decision-making processes of ten libraries
    This paper explores how library managers go about implementing RFID (radio frequency identification) technology and particularly how associated privacy issues have been managed. The research methodology consisted of a literature review, theme identification, interview scheduling, interviews and interview analysis. The sample was ten libraries or library networks and eighteen participants. Findings covered the main drivers of RFID development, perceived benefits, tag data, data security, levels of ethical concern, public consultation, potential impact of technological developments on ethical issues, and managers’ sources of ethical decision-making. Analysis of potential ethical issues was not found to be a central part of the process of implementing RFID technology in the libraries. The study sees RFID implementation as an informative example of current practice in the implementation of new technologies in libraries and suggests that we look at management structures and decision making processes to clarify where responsibility for ethical considerations should lie.
      788Scopus© Citations 8