Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    COVID-19 workplace impacts - Irish OSH professionals experience and observations
    COVID-19 has had a significant impact on workers, arising from adaptations to control measures and consequent behaviour changes that minimise disease spread in the workplace. From an occupational safety & health (OSH) perspective, understanding how adaptations and behaviour changes have impacted workers is relevant to how organisations can preserve the health of their workers when adapting to future health emergencies.
      81
  • Publication
    COVID-19 prevention and control measures in workplace settings: a rapid review and meta-analysis
    Workplaces can be high-risk environments for SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks and subsequent community transmission. Identifying, understanding, and implementing effective workplace SARS-CoV-2 infection prevention and control (IPC) measures is critical to protect workers, their families, and communities. A rapid review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize evidence assessing the effectiveness of COVID-19 IPC measures implemented in global workplace settings through April 2021. Medline, Embase, PubMed, and Cochrane Library were searched for studies that quantitatively assessed the effectiveness of workplace COVID-19 IPC measures. The included studies comprised varying empirical designs and occupational settings. Measures of interest included surveillance measures, outbreak investigations, environmental adjustments, personal protective equipment (PPE), changes in work arrangements, and worker education. Sixty-one studies from healthcare, nursing home, meatpacking, manufacturing, and office settings were included, accounting for ~280,000 employees based in Europe, Asia, and North America. Meta-analyses showed that combined IPC measures resulted in lower employee COVID-19 positivity rates (0.2% positivity; 95% CI 0–0.4%) than single measures such as asymptomatic PCR testing (1.7%; 95% CI 0.9–2.9%) and universal masking (24%; 95% CI 3.4–55.5%). Modelling studies showed that combinations of (i) timely and widespread contact tracing and case isolation, (ii) facilitating smaller worker cohorts, and (iii) effective use of PPE can reduce workplace transmission. Comprehensive COVID-19 IPC measures incorporating swift contact tracing and case isolation, PPE, and facility zoning can effectively prevent workplace outbreaks. Masking alone should not be considered sufficient protection from SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks in the workplace.
      355Scopus© Citations 58
  • Publication
    COVID-19 prevention and control measures in workplace settings: a rapid review and meta-analysis
    Workplaces are high-risk environments for SARS-CoV-2 outbreaks and subsequent community transmission. Identifying, understanding, and implementing effective workplace SARS-CoV-2 infection prevention and control (IPC) measures is critical to protect workers, their families, and communities.
      103
  • Publication
    Wearable sensing and mobile devices: the future of post-concussion monitoring?
    In the past decade, concussion has received large amounts of attention in public, medical and research circles. While our understanding of the nature and management of concussion has greatly improved, there are still major limitations which need to be addressed surrounding the identification of the injury, determining when an individual is safe to return to normal activity, and what factors may contribute to the development of post-concussion syndrome (PCS).The current model of concussion management involves a triage evaluation in the acute stage of injury, focusing on the classic signs and symptoms of concussion. Next, the clinician attempts to evaluate key components of cerebral function through clinical symptom evaluation, and traditional assessments of motor and neurocognitive function [1]. The development of the sports concussion assessment tool (SCAT) saw a massive leap forward in the strategies employed in the management of concussion, as it acknowledged the multifactorial nature of concussion, and provided a standardised means for clinicians to assess the many domains of cerebral function [2]. While these methods have demonstrated some promise in the acute stage, they are not designed for serial monitoring (particularly in instances where PCS develops) [3], and provide us with very little clinically relevant information that can assist clinicians in the return to learn/ sport/ performance process.
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