Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Transport needs of older people in rural Ireland
    Investment in public transport in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland has been predominantly in urban areas, with the development of a coherent rural transport policy being very much neglected. This has lead to high levels of car dependency in rural areas in both countries. This paper describes a project that focuses on one particularly vulnerable group: older people in rural areas. The project examined the problems that are faced by older people in rural areas in accessing services and carrying out trips in rural areas of Ireland and Northern Ireland. It looked at how unmet transport needs are leading to social exclusion amongst older people, a problem which will only become worse in the future as the population ages and as investment in rural public transport remains low.
      1256
  • Publication
    Transport for older people in rural areas
    (CARDI (Centre for Ageing Research and Development in Ireland), 2010-12-10) ;
    This report describes a project that examined the transport needs of older people living in rural areas in Northern Ireland and in the Republic of Ireland. The project had several important objectives: To review current international research into the transport needs of older people, in particular in rural areas. To look at rural transport policy in NI and ROI, and to assess the impacts of that policy on older people in rural areas. To find out about the travel patterns of older people in rural NI and ROI (What modes do they use? What types of trips are they making?) To find out about the problems and difficulties faced by older people in rural Ireland (What trips can they not make? What modes are difficult to access?)
      498
  • Publication
    Transport for the elderly - what happens in rural areas?
    This paper describes work being carried out in Northern Ireland and in the Republic of Ireland to examine the transport needs of older people in rural areas both north and south of the border. The project commenced in July 2009 and will be completed in July 2010. Therefore, at the time of writing of this paper the project is still on-going. This paper is structured as follows. The first section sets out a literature review of research into the transport needs of older people. The paper will then go on to describe the current situation regarding transport for older people in rural areas in Northern Ireland and in the Republic of Ireland and will set out some of the policies and projects that are currently in place to provide transport for older people in rural areas. The paper will also contrast the situation in the 2 countries and will set out what improvements and changes to policy are needed to bring about an improvement in the status of transport for older people in Ireland. Finally, the paper describes the project objectives, methodology and the focus groups that are currently taking place in Ireland and Northern Ireland to examine the transport needs of older people in rural areas.
      407
  • Publication
    Travel, transport and energy implications of university-related student travel: A case study approach
    This study highlighted significant cultural differences and complexity in travel behaviour associated with travel to university across the UK and Ireland. This paper examines university travel behaviours and the implications for emissions, across the 2012–2013 academic year, based on responses from 1049 students across 17 universities in Ireland and the UK. Surveys were analysed to examine the trips of students both during term time and when accessing the universities each year. The data analysis in this paper examines three aspects of the transport implications of travel to and from university. Firstly the journey between university and term time address (or permanent address if the respondent does not have a separate term time address), secondly the journey between the university area and a separate permanent address where relevant; and thirdly implications for emissions resulting from university-related travel. The study found that student car users were more likely to be female, older students, or studying part time; male students were more likely to use active modes. The study indicated interesting differences between students living in different parts of the UK and Ireland. For example, it was found that there was a higher level of car dependence amongst Northern Irish students compared to other areas; and a greater variability in travel distances in Scotland and Northern Ireland. In England, car use was more pronounced when students travelled from their permanent address to term time address, and, as in Ireland, there was evidence of more car sharing on such trips. Public transport usage was more pronounced amongst Scottish students. The effect of these transport choices on emissions is significant and demonstrates the importance of education related trips to the development of a transport policy response. The analysis shows that annual emissions are highest for regular travel to and from university when a student has a permanent address rather than a separate term time and permanent address.
      335Scopus© Citations 32