Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Modelling residential building stock heating load demand - Comparison of occupancy models at large scale
    In the residential housing sector, a strong correlation exists between occupant behaviour and space heating energy use. In particular, the occupancy scenario (e.g., daytime absence, morning presence, etc.) has a significant influence on residential heating load profiles, as well as on cumulative heating energy consumption. In the literature, many occupancy models have been utilised to predict occupancy profiles of individual dwellings as part of larger residential building stocks. The choice of the most suitable occupancy model is a trade-off between complexity, accuracy and computational effort, as well as model integration at large scale. The current paper analyzes the combined influence of different occupancy assumptions and different occupancy models on housing heating loads for a UK building stock sample. The building stock heating loads are estimated using a dynamic thermal model based on an equivalent Resistance-Capacitance electric circuit. It is assumed that the heating periods are coincident with the actively occupied periods. The actively occupied periods are first determined using two existing consolidated occupancy models, and then by using newly developed probabilistic occupancy models. All the models are characterised by a different grade of complexity and accuracy. Comparing the results of all the presented methodologies, the advantages of the new probabilistic approaches are analyzed.
      152
  • Publication
    Modelling Household Occupancy Profiles using Data Mining Clustering Techniques on Time Use Data
    A strong correlation exists between occupant behaviour and energy demand in residential buildings. The choice of the most suitable occupancy model to be integrated in high temporal resolution energy demand simulations is heavily in uenced by the purpose of the building energy demand model and it is a tradeoff between complexity and accuracy. The current paper introduces a new occupancy model that produces multi-day occupancy profiles and can be adaptable to various occupancy scenarios (e.g., at home all day, mostly absent) and scalable to different population sizes. The methodology exploits data mining clustering techniques with Time Use Survey (TUS) data to produce realistic building occupancy patterns. The overall methodology can be subdivided into two steps: 1. Identification and grouping of households with similar daily occupancy profiles, using data mining clustering techniques; 2. Creation of probabilistic occupancy profiles using 'inverse function method'. The data from the model can be used as input to residential dwelling energy models that use occupancy time-series as inputs.
      249ScopusĀ© Citations 5