Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    The firm size distribution and inter-industry diversification
    (University College Dublin. Geary Institute, 2009-08) ; ;
    We show that the stylized facts of the Firm Size Distribution (FSD) by age cohorts, as shown in Cabral and Mata (2003), bind within 4-digit manufacturing industries in the UK and Belgium. As in Klepper and Thompson (2006) and Sutton (1998), we explore whether time to build a portfolio of products is a mechanism that relates age to firm size. While inter industry diversification, to some extent, accounts for the role of age, we find that the presence of economies of scope has a separate impact on firm size when controlling for age, amongst other factors. Using the techniques in Cabral and Mata’s we show that the FSD by degrees of product diversification shifts to the right, but more so in older age groups. This shows a role for inter-industry diversification over and above an age effect.
      403
  • Publication
    The effect of real exchange rate movements on the life expectancy of manufacturing plants in Ireland, 1973-94
    We estimate the factors that affect the life expectancy of plants operating in the manufacturing sector of Ireland over the period 1980-1994. Our results suggest that real exchange rate appreciations have caused a great number of infant mortalities in domestic plants both in the traditional and high tech sectors over this period. Real effective exchange rate movements are estimated to have no effect on the plant life expectancy of foreign owned firms. Domestic plants operating in the high-tech sector are estimated to have a higher life expectancy than those operating in the traditional sector. In addition, the real exchange rate effect on the survival rates of domestic plants in the R&D intensive sectors even though significant is weaker compared with the traditional sector.
      149
  • Publication
    Employment dynamics of newly established and traditional firms : a comparison of Russia and the Ukraine
    (LICOS Centre for Transition Economics, 1999) ;
    In this paper we test the effects of ownership, competition and disorganisation on firm level employment dynamics using a unique data set of 150 Russian and 300 Ukrainian firms. Our results, in contrast to findings in Central and East European Countries, suggest that newly established firms do not out perform those that existed under central planning during the transition process. In addition, while competition seems to play no role in employment determination, disorganisation is shown to constrain firm employment in the Ukraine but not in Russia. Such outcomes are explained by the nature and timing of restructuring in these countries.
      242