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    Intra-articular delivery of a nanocomplex comprising salmon calcitonin, hyaluronic acid, and chitosan using an equine model of joint inflammation
    Polyelectrolyte nanoparticle constructs (NPs) comprising salmon calcitonin (sCT), chitosan (CS), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were previously established as having anti-inflammatory potential when injected via the intra-articular (i.a.) route to a mouse model. We attempted to translate the formulation to a large animal model, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated equine model of joint inflammation. The aim was to manufacture under aseptic conditions to produce sterile pyrogen-free NPs, to confirm physicochemical characteristics, and to test toxicity and efficacy in a pilot study. NP dispersions were successfully formulated using pharmaceutical-grade source materials and were aseptically manufactured under GMP-simulated conditions in a grade A modular aseptic processing workstation. The NP formulation had no detectable pathogen or endotoxin contamination. NPs were then tested versus a lactated Ringer’s solution control following single i.a. injections to the radiocarpal joints of two groups of four horses pre-treated with LPS, followed by arthrocentesis at set intervals over 1 week. There was no evidence of treatment-related toxicity over the period. While there were no differences between clinical read-outs of the NP and the control, two synovial fluid-derived biomarkers associated with cartilage turnover revealed a beneficial effect of NPs. In conclusion, NPs comprising well-known materials were manufactured for an equine i.a.-injectable pilot study and yielded no NP-attributable toxicity. Evidence of NP-associated benefit at the level of secondary endpoints was detected as a result of decreases in synovial fluid inflammatory biomarkers.
      350Scopus© Citations 8