Now showing 1 - 5 of 5
  • Publication
    Identifying representative textual sources in blog networks
    (University College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Informatics, 2011-02) ; ; ; ;
    We apply methods from social network analysis and visualization to facilitate a study of the Irish blogosphere from a cultural studies perspective. We focus on solving the practical issues that arise when the goal is to perform textual analysis of the corpus produced by a network of bloggers. Previous studies into blogging networks have noted difficulties arising when trying to identify the extent and boundaries of these networks. As a response to calls for increasingly data-led approaches in media and cultural studies, we discuss a variety of social network analysis methods that can be used to identify which blogs can be seen as members of a posited "Irish blogging network". We identify hub blogs, communities of sites corresponding to different topics, and representative bloggers within these communities. Based on this study, we propose a set of analysis guidelines for researchers who wish to map out blogging networks.
      2838
  • Publication
    ThemeCrowds: Multiresolution Summaries of Twitter Usage
    (University College Dublin. School of Computer Science and Informatics, 2011-06) ; ; ; ;
    Users of social media sites, such as Twitter, rapidly generate large volumes of text content on a daily basis. Visual summaries are needed to understand what groups of people are saying collectively in this unstructured text data. Users will typically discuss a wide variety of topics, where the number of authors talking about a specific topic can quickly grow or diminish over time, and what the collective is saying about the subject can shift as a situation develops. In this paper, we present a technique that summarises what collections of Twitter users are saying about certain topics over time. As the correct resolution for inspecting the data is unknown in advance, the users are clustered hierarchically over a fixed time interval based on the similarity of their posts. The visualisation technique takes this data structure as its input. Given a topic, it finds the correct resolution of users at each time interval and provides tags to summarise what the collective is discussing. The technique is tested on three microblogging corpora, consisting of up to tens of millions of tweets and over a million users. We provide some preliminary user feedback from a research group interested in the area of social media analysis, where this tool could be applied.
      23
  • Publication
    Deriving insights from national happiness indices
    In online social media, individuals produce vast amounts of content which in effect "instruments" the world around us. Users on sites such as Twitter are publicly broadcasting status updates that provide an indication of their mood at a given moment in time, often accompanied by geolocation information. A number of strategies exist to aggregate such content to produce sentiment scores in order to build a "happiness index". In this paper, we describe such a system based on Twitter that maintains a happiness index for nine US cities. The main contribution of this paper is a companion system called SentireCrowds that allows us to identify the underlying causes behind shifts in sentiment. This ability to analyse the components of the sentiment signal highlights a number of problems. It shows that sentiment scoring on social media data without considering context is difficult. More importantly, it highlights cases where sentiment scoring methods are susceptible to unexpected shifts due to noise and trending memes.
      1277Scopus© Citations 14
  • Publication
    Visualization of trends in subscriber attributes of communities on mobile telecommunications networks
    Churn, the decision for a subscriber to leave a provider, is frequently of interest in the telecommunications industry. Previous research provides evidence that social influence can be a factor in mobile telecommunications churn. In our work, presented at ASONAM, we presented a system, called ChurnVis, to visualize the evolution of mobile telecommunications churn and subscriber actions over time. First, we infer a social network from call detail records. Then, we compute components based on an overlay of this social network and churn activity. We compute summaries of the attributes associated with the subscribers and finally, we visualize the components in a privacy preserving way. The system is able to present summaries of thousands of churn components in graphs of hundreds of millions of edges. One of the drawbacks of the original approach was that churn components were sometimes very large, leading to over-aggregation in the summary data. In this extension of the ASONAM paper, we adapt the ChurnVis approach to operate on the output of a community finding algorithm and present new results based on this adaptation.
      343Scopus© Citations 4
  • Publication
    Themecrowds : multiresolution summaries of Twitter usage
    Users of social media sites, such as Twitter, rapidly generate large volumes of text content on a daily basis. Visual summaries are needed to understand what groups of people are saying collectively in this unstructured text data. Users will typically discuss a wide variety of topics, where the number of authors talking about a specific topic can quickly grow or diminish over time, and what the collective is saying about the subject can shift as a situation develops. In this paper, we present a technique that summarises what collections of Twitter users are saying about certain topics over time. As the correct resolution for inspecting the data is unknown in advance, the users are clustered hierarchically over a fixed time interval based on the similarity of their posts. The visualisation technique takes this data structure as its input. Given a topic, it finds the correct resolution of users at each time interval and provides tags to summarise what the collective is discussing. The technique is tested on a large microblogging corpus, consisting of millions of tweets and over a million users.
      413Scopus© Citations 34