Now showing 1 - 10 of 214
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Schizophrenia and the relationship between insight depression and self-deception

2001, Moore, Orla, Cassidy, Eugene, Carr, Alan, O'Callaghan, Eadhbhart

Forty six individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia were divided classified as having or high and low insight on the basis of their scores on the Scale for the Assessment of Unawareness of Mental Disorder. A comparison of the two groups showed that while they were demographically similar, the high insight group showed less defensive self-deception on the Balanced inventory of Desirable Responding and more depressive symptomatology on the Beck Depression Inventory and the Calgary Depression scale. The results were interpreted as supporting the view that self-deception is used as a defense by individuals with schizophrenia who have poor insight and this accounts for their lower levels of depressive symptomatology.

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A quadruple dose of disorder

2001-11-30, Carr, Alan

These four textbooks are designed specifically for those studying undergraduate abnormal psychology at North American universities, but they would serve as useful resources on undergraduate psychology courses on this side of the Atlantic. Supplementary reading would, however, be essential to add a European or British dimension.

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The effectiveness of psychological treatments of offenders

2001, Carr, Alan

The aim of this paper is to summarize the effectiveness of psychological interventions in the treatment of offenders with reference to up-to-date authoritative reviews.

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Physical child abuse: A comprehensive family based approach to treatment

2000, Carr, Alan

Physical abuse within the family may be conceptualized as the outcome of a complex process in which a child with particular characteristics which rendered him or her vulnerable to abuse, is injured by a parent involved in an ongoing problematic behaviour pattern, subserved by particular belief systems and constrained by historical, contextual and constitutional predisposing factors. When families are referred by statutory child protection agencies to therapy services for treatment, initially a contract for comprehensive assessment should be established with the family and referrer. Assessment should involve interviews with all members of the child system and should cover relevant risk and protective factors and a verbal reconstruction of the abusive incident. A contract for treatment may be offered if the assessment shows that the parents accept responsibility for the abuse, are committed to meeting their child's needs, are committed to improving their own psychological wellbeing and where they have the ability to change. Treatment should be based on clear contracts to meet specific targets. Treatment and case management plans involve a central focus on improving parent-child interaction through direct work with parents and children together. This may be supplemented with couples work, interventions in the wider system and individual work for parents focusing on parent-craft and the management of personal difficulties such as mood and anger regulation. Children may also receive input in therapeutic pre-school placements.

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Clinical psychologists' roles

2000, Doran, Alan, Carr, Alan

A survey of all clinical psychologists employed by eight health boards in the Republic of Ireland in 1994 and 1995 was conducted and the response rate was 54%. The views of the 67 respondents on their actual, desired and expected future work roles are described in this paper.

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Research on the therapeutic alliance in family therapy

2005, Carr, Alan

The chapter opens with a brief description of therapeutic alliance assessment scales that may routinely be used in clinical practice and then research which highlights the strong relationship between the therapeutic alliance and outcome in marital and family therapy is discussed. The remainder of the chapter is a selective review of process research which points to specific practices that therapists may incorporate into their own styles to improve the quality of therapeutic relationships.

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Supporting parents of adolescent perpetrators of CSA

2004, Duane, Yvonne, Carr, Alan, Cherry, Joan, et al.

The importance of parental involvement in the treatment of their adolescent CSA perpetrators cannot be underestimated. One of the defining differences between the fields of adult and adolescent sexual offending is the fact that adolescents are still in a formative stage of development. Parents can still exercise a major influence in re-engaging children back on a normative developmental pathway and reducing future risk to a minimum. It is also important to include parents of adolescent CSA perpetrators in treatment programmes because it is well documented in Irish and international studies that some have significant problems.

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Effects of actual and potential stressor control on physiological and self reported stress responses

1988, Carr, Alan, Wilde, Gerald J. S.

Two experiments were conducted in which stressor controllability was varied while stressor predictability and other stressor properties were held constant. In each experiment stressor control led to a reduction in anticipatory physiological stress. These findings support the minimax hypothesis but contravene alternative theories that attribute the beneficial effects of stressor control to the predictive information furnished by controlling actions.

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Mood congruent memory bias of individuals with depressed mood and anxiety

2001, Lange, Gregor, Carr, Alan

Mood congruent memory (MCM) is the tendency for individuals to encode and retrieve affectively-valenced information which is congruent with their prevailing mood state more easily than other information. For example, a depressed or sad individual tends to remember negative or unpleasant memories better than positive or happy memories.

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Positive psychology

2005-01, Carr, Alan

Clinical Psychology has traditionally focused on psychological deficits and disability. It has rarely privileged clients’ resilience and resourcefulness. The critical psychology tradition in the UK has highlighted the shortcomings of this approach (Johnstone, 2000; Newnes, Holmes, & Dunn, 1999, 2001). The new positive psychology movement aims to develop a knowledge base focusing on human strengths to complement deficit based approaches (Snyder & Lopez, 2002). This message of positive psychology is an optimistic one. The results of scientific research point to three reliable ways to find happiness (Carr, 2004). 1. Cultivate relationships which involve deep attachment and commitment. 2. Involve yourself in absorbing work and leisure activities in which you exercise your strengths, talents and interests. 3. Cultivate an optimistic, future-oriented perspective on life in which you expect the best and value the future more than the present.