Now showing 1 - 10 of 40
  • Publication
    Complex Contexts: Women's Community Education in Ireland
    Education is not a neutral process, it can be used to establish and maintain conformity or be part of a process of liberation and social change (Freire, 1979; hooks, 1994). The Irish State’s failure to acknowledge this lack of neutrality has characterised the formal education system in Ireland since its inception. From the introduction of the National School System of education in 1831 to the present day, the ruling force of the Catholic Church within education is evidenced in the gendered and conformist nature of this formal education landscape. Systems of privilege have been maintained and reproduced through education, in which power is exercised by means of exclusion, coercion and control. However, simultaneously individuals and groups of women have challenged this formal, religiously infused conformist education system. Their demands for full and equal access to mainstream education at all levels, including within the academy, served to challenge this hegemonic force. They also pioneered the development of innovative and radical forms of adult and community education as a means toward individual and community empowerment. This paper seeks to highlight women’s educational interventions historically and socially through an explicit gendered lens and with a particular focus on community-higher-education.
      227
  • Publication
    Provision of childcare services in Ireland
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Justice, 2008-03) ;
    External report commissioned by and presented to the EU Directorate-General Employment and Social Affairs, Unit G1 'Equality between women and men'
      14975
  • Publication
    Gender Equality in Ireland 2015
    (European Parliament, 2015)
    Upon request by the FEMM Committee, this paper explores changes in gender equality legislation, policies and practices in Ireland with particular emphasis on the period from 2012-2015. Gender equality infrastructure, gender gaps in employment, unemployment, poverty and pay rates are analysed and women’s level of participation in political, economic and administrative decision-making in Ireland is detailed. Provision of childcare services, as well as the extent to which gender dimensions are taken into account in health and welfare policies, are also examined.
      399
  • Publication
      374
  • Publication
    Gender equality and economic crisis: Ireland and EU
    (Routledge, 2017-08)
    This chapter explores gender dimensions to the austerity policies which have been pursued across the EU over the recent economic crisis years, with particular attention to Ireland. From a gender equality standpoint, it is interesting to examine the extent to which there are common gender dimensions to the policy processes that have been pursued across the EU. There is a definite gender dimension to the policies that have been implemented, both in Ireland and across the EU, through the years of the crisis and the adoption of austerity policies (Barry and Conroy 2013). This chapter looks at the Irish situation but also takes a comparative perspective drawing on analyses of core policies at EU level, exploring the gender patterns evident in the way in which economic and social policies have been developed and implemented and their consequences from a gender equality perspective (Rubery and Karmessini 2013; ENEGE 2013; Oxfam 2013; Trefell 2012).
      165
  • Publication
    Gender equality: Economic value of care from the perspective of the applicable EU funds: An exploration of an EU strategy towards valuing the care economy
    (European Parliament, 2021-06-21) ;
    This Report was commissioned by the Dept of Citizens' Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the FEMM Committee of the European Parliament. It explores the impact of COVID-19 on the EU care economy, the gendered nature of care work and its continued reliance on unpaid or low-paid work of women. Issues of valuing and measuring care are examined selected countries are examined with different systems of care provision. The Report concludes that despite the recognition of the centrality of the care economy during the pandemic, the establishment of a new highly significant EU funding mechanism (the Recovery and Resilience Fund, RRF) is focused largely on digital and green investments, paying only marginal attention to gender equality and the care economy.
      178
  • Publication
    What do we mean by bodily autonomy? And what does bodily autonomy mean for women in particular?
    (New Binary Press, 2018-03)
    Women's bodily autonomy has been contested through history and Ireland is a key territory in which this contest continues to be played out – a contest with implications at a global level. Our contemporary history is littered with legal, political, economic and social ways in which women's autonomy has been limited and restricted Despite the Proclamation of 1916 declaring equal citizenship and equal opportunities, in reality the new Irish Free State of 1922 saw the introduction of a battery of anti-women legislation, restricting rights and roles and aiming at confining women to the domestic sphere. Most women in Ireland could not sign contracts, own property, open bank accounts, access paid work in most areas of the economy, sit on juries or until the 1990s access contraception and divorce. Women were forced to resign from paid employment on marriage across the civil service, public sector, banks and insurance (a law introduced in 1932 and only removed in 1973 on joining the EEC – later the EU) (Connolly 2005; 2015).
      1032
  • Publication
    Short report on migrant women in Ireland (part B)
    (University College Dublin. School of Social Justice, 2010-10)
    External report commissioned by and presented to the EU Directorate-General Employment and Social Affairs, Unit G1 'Equality between women and men'
      655
  • Publication
    Changing Economic and Social Worlds of Irish Women
    (New Island Books, 2008-02-25)
    We have just lived through a decade of enormous change in the economic and social position of Irish women. From a traditional position in which the majority of women were carers - unpaid carers - women now occupy the dual role of carer-earner. The majority of women are now in paid employment, including women with children, married women and a significant proportion of women lone parents. This has meant huge changes in women's lives, changes which have been brought about by the decisions and choices of thousands of individual women, despite the lack of policies or support systems to facilitate such change. This chapter explores some of the key aspects of the economic and social policy frameworks that shape, and sometimes determine, the changing patterns of Irish women's lives.
      140
  • Publication
    Economic Crisis and Gender equality: Ireland and the EU
    (Foundation for European Progressive Studies, 2014-12)
    This paper explores gender dimensions to the austerity policies which have been pursued across the EU over the recent economic crisis years, with particular attention to Ireland. From a gender equality standpoint, it is interesting to examine the extent to which there are common gender dimensions to the policy processes that have been pursued across the EU. This paper looks at the Irish situation but also takes a comparative perspective drawing on analyses of core policies at EU level, exploring the gender patterns evident in the way in which economic and social policies have been developed and implemented.
      796