Interactions of care and control: Human-animal relationships in hunter-gatherer communities in near-contemporary eastern Siberia and the Mesolithic of northwest Europe

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Title: Interactions of care and control: Human-animal relationships in hunter-gatherer communities in near-contemporary eastern Siberia and the Mesolithic of northwest Europe
Authors: Scarre, Chris
Warren, Graeme
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/10143
Date: 1-Apr-2019
Online since: 2019-04-25T07:07:24Z
Abstract: This contribution explores modes of human–animal interactions in hunter-gatherer communities in near-contemporary eastern Siberia and the Mesolithic of northwest Europe. By discussing notions of care and control and drawing on syntheses of Russian-language ethnographic data from eastern Siberia, this paper explores the diversity and nuances of hunter-gatherers’ interactions with animals. While some contexts may reveal respectful yet diverse treatments of the hunted animals, others suggest that hunter-gatherers also might have interacted with animals kept as pets, captives or companions, thus implicating relations in which notions of care and control seem to be tightly bound.
Funding Details: European Commission Horizon 2020
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Journal: Cambridge Archaeological Journal
Start page: 1
End page: 14
Copyright (published version): 2019 The McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research
Keywords: Human–animal interactionsHunter-gatherer communitiesSiberiaNorthwest EuropeMesolithic period
DOI: 10.1017/s0959774300000226
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Archaeology Research Collection

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