The human–canine environment: A risk factor for non-play bites?

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMessam, Locksley L. McV.-
dc.contributor.authorKass, Philip H.-
dc.contributor.authorChomel, Bruno B.-
dc.contributor.authorHart, Lynette A.-
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-29T09:07:33Z-
dc.date.available2019-04-29T09:07:33Z-
dc.date.copyright2007 Elsevieren_US
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.citationVeterinary Journalen_US
dc.identifier.issn1090-0233-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/10180-
dc.description.abstractFew dog bite risk factor studies have been conducted. This veterinary clinic-based retrospective cohort study was aimed at identifying human-canine environmental risk factors for non-play bites in Kingston, Jamaica (660) and San Francisco (SF), USA (452). Data were analysed using modified Poisson regression with confounders selected using directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) and the change-in-estimate procedure. Dogs acquired for companionship were more likely (RR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.02-2.70) to bite than those acquired for protection. Routinely allowing a dog into the presence of visitors was also positively associated with it biting. A dog sleeping in a family member's bedroom was a risk factor for biting in Kingston (RR = 2.54; 95% CI 1.43-4.54) but not in SF, while being able to leave the yard unaccompanied was a risk factor for biting in SF (RR = 3.40; 95% CI 1.98-5.85) but not in Kingston. Overall, dogs which were less restricted in their interactions with humans were at elevated risk for biting. An observed association with dog bites in one cultural setting might not exist in another.en_US
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherElsevieren_US
dc.rightsThis is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in The Veterinary Journal. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in The Veterinary Journal (177, 2, (2008)) https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.08.020en_US
dc.subjectKingstonen_US
dc.subjectJamaicaen_US
dc.subjectSan Franciscoen_US
dc.subjectUSAen_US
dc.subjectNon-playen_US
dc.subjectDogen_US
dc.subjectBiteen_US
dc.subjectRisk factoren_US
dc.titleThe human–canine environment: A risk factor for non-play bites?en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactotherlocksley.messam@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume177en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.startpage205en_US
dc.identifier.endpage215en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tvjl.2007.08.020-
dc.neeo.contributorMessam|Locksley L. McV.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorKass|Philip H.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorChomel|Bruno B.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorHart|Lynette A.|aut|-
dc.date.updated2018-09-20T14:29:01Z-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Veterinary Medicine Research Collection
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