Diagnosing opioid addiction in people with chronic pain

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Title: Diagnosing opioid addiction in people with chronic pain
Authors: Gorfinkel, LaurenVoon, PaulineWood, EvanKlimas, Jan
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/10548
Date: 21-Sep-2018
Online since: 2019-05-20T13:58:16Z
Abstract: Over the past two decades, a steep rise in the number of opioids dispensed for pain treatment has been accompanied by a dramatic rise in overdose deaths in the United States. In 2016, up to 32 000 deaths reportedly involved prescription opioids, and the economic burden of prescription opioid overdose has been estimated to exceed $78bn (£59bn; €67bn) annually. Despite all the evidence of harm, however, it remains unclear exactly how to determine if a patient with chronic pain has opioid addiction, or what criteria should serve as a gold standard in making a diagnosis of opioid use disorder (OUD) in this context. This is an important gap in the literature that hinders both evidence-based care and research on the links between prescription opioids and OUD. In this editorial, we discuss the limitations of diagnosing OUD in people with chronic pain, and make several recommendations for further research.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: BMJ
Journal: The BMJ
Volume: 362
Issue: k3949
Copyright (published version): 2018 British Medical Journal
Keywords: OpioidsPain treatmentOverdosePrescription opioidsOpioid use disorder (OUD)Chronic pain
DOI: 10.1136/bmj.k3949
Other versions: https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k3949/related
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Medicine Research Collection

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