Home, Reach, and the Sense of Place

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Title: Home, Reach, and the Sense of Place
Authors: Buttimer, Anne
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/10731
Date: 1980
Online since: 2019-05-30T10:57:22Z
Abstract: “Country Road take me home to the place I belong…” Emotionally laden eulogy on the meaning of place rings through much modern poetry and song. Nostalgia for some real or imagined state of harmony and centeredness once experienced in rural settings haunts the victim of mobile and fragmented urban milieu. Like many a fortune seeker amidst the lights of Broadway who longed for the simple cottage near the rippling stream back home I suppose one could say: “you never know what you’ve got ‘til it’s gone”. Patriotic songs about native soil and forest that built the spirit of nationhood in many of our countries were often written in the cities of North America and Australia. And today, as the uniqueness of places becomes more and more threatened by the homogenizing veneer of commercialism and standardized-component architecture, many long for their hembygd and smultronställe.
Type of material: Book Chapter
Publisher: Croom Helm Publishers
Start page: 166
End page: 187
Copyright (published version): 1980 the Authors
Keywords: Regional identitySociologyRelationship between people and placeCommercialism
Other versions: https://www.amazon.com/Human-Experience-Space-Routledge-Revivals/dp/1138924628
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Is part of: Buttimer, A., Seamon, D. (eds.). The Human Experience of Place and Space
ISBN: 978-1138924628
Appears in Collections:Geography Research Collection

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