The co-design, implementation and evaluation of a serious board game ‘PlayDecide patient safety’ to educate junior doctors about patient safety and the importance of reporting safety concerns

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Title: The co-design, implementation and evaluation of a serious board game ‘PlayDecide patient safety’ to educate junior doctors about patient safety and the importance of reporting safety concerns
Authors: Ward, MarieNí Shé, ÉidínDe Brún, AoifeKorpos, ChristianHamza, MoayedRobinson, KarenMcAuliffe, Eilishet al.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/10858
Date: 25-Jun-2019
Online since: 2019-07-08T09:54:23Z
Abstract: Background: We believe junior doctors are in a unique position in relation to reporting of incidents and safety culture. They are still in training and are also ‘fresh eyes’ on the system providing valuable insights into what they perceive as safe and unsafe behaviour. The aim of this study was to co-design and implement an embedded learning intervention – a serious board game – to educate junior doctors about patient safety and the importance of reporting safety concerns, while at the same time shaping a culture of responsiveness from senior medical staff. Methods: A serious game based on the PlayDecide framework was co-designed and implemented in two large urban acute teaching hospitals. To evaluate the educational value of the game voting on the position statements was recorded at the end of each game by a facilitator who also took notes after the game of key themes that emerged from the discussion. A sample of players were invited on a voluntary basis to take part in semi-structured interviews after playing the game using Flanagan’s Critical Incident Technique. A paper-based questionnaire on ‘Safety Concerns’ was developed and administered to assess pre-and post-playing the game reporting behaviour. Dissemination workshops were held with senior clinicians to promote more inclusive leadership behaviours and responsiveness to junior doctors raising of safety concerns from senior clinicians. Results: The game proved to be a valuable patient safety educational tool and proved effective in encouraging deep discussion on patient safety. There was a significant change in the reporting behaviour of junior doctors in one of the hospitals following the intervention. Conclusion: In healthcare, limited exposure to patient safety training and narrow understanding of safety compromise patients lives. The existing healthcare system needs to value the role that junior doctors and others could play in shaping a positive safety culture where reporting of all safety concerns is encouraged. Greater efforts need to be made at hospital level to develop a more pro-active safe and just culture that supports and encourages junior doctors and ultimately all doctors to understand and speak up about safety concerns.
Funding Details: Health Research Board
Health Service Executive
metadata.dc.description.othersponsorship: Medical Council of Ireland - Medical Education Research Grant (MERG) Awards
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
Journal: BMC Medical Education
Volume: 19
Issue: 1 (Article 232)
Start page: 1
End page: 14
Copyright (published version): 2019 the Authors
Keywords: Medical educationJunior doctorsEmbedded learningSerious gamePatient safetySafety culture
DOI: 10.1186/s12909-019-1655-2
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Nursing, Midwifery & Health Systems Research Collection

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