Exploring the Use of Mobile Athlete Self-report Measures in Elite Gaelic Games: A Qualitative Approach

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDuignan, Ciara-
dc.contributor.authorSlevin, Patrick-
dc.contributor.authorCaulfield, Brian-
dc.contributor.authorBlake, Catherine-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-11T08:58:33Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-11T08:58:33Z-
dc.date.copyright2019 the National Strength and Conditioning Associationen_US
dc.date.issued2019-08-08-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Strength and Conditioning researchen_US
dc.identifier.issn1064-8011-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/11075-
dc.description.abstractAthlete self-report measures (ASRMs) are used in research and practice as an accurate, practical, and accessible method of athlete monitoring. Mobile adaptations of constructs from validated ASRM have increasingly been used for athlete monitoring in various sports settings; however, insights on the user experience and perceived value of these systems in the applied team sport setting have been limited. This study aimed to portray the experiences of stakeholders using a pre-existing mobile ASRM (M-ASRM) in elite Gaelic games. Twenty-one stakeholders in elite Gaelic games were recruited for this study (players n = 10, coaches and support staff n = 11). Subjects completed a semistructured interview with the lead researcher regarding their experience of using an M-ASRM in practice. Thematic analysis of the transcripts was conducted using NVivo 12 software. Results were defined under the themes of positive and negative user experience. Positive user experience was portrayed through M-ASRM uses and perceived value: communication and information disclosure, remote player monitoring, decision making and advanced planning, and player education and self-management. Negative user experience was portrayed through M-ASRM challenges: player adherence, player dishonesty, coach time and expertise requirements, and sociotechnical and system factors. Results outline the major uses of M-ASRM in elite Gaelic games and, importantly, highlight the key challenges experienced by stakeholders. These results can be applied by coaches, sports medicine professionals, and sports scientists using or intending to use an M-ASRM, providing key considerations to employ for effective use in team sport.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWolters Kluweren_US
dc.subjectAthlete monitoringen_US
dc.subjectWell-beingen_US
dc.titleExploring the Use of Mobile Athlete Self-report Measures in Elite Gaelic Games: A Qualitative Approachen_US
dc.title.alternativeMobile Athlete Self-Report Measure Use in Elite Gaelic Gamesen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.check.date2020-03-03-
dc.identifier.doi10.1519/JSC.0000000000003334-
dc.neeo.contributorDuignan|Ciara|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorSlevin|Patrick|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorCaulfield|Brian|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorBlake|Catherine|aut|-
dc.date.embargo2020-08-31en_US
dc.description.othersponsorshipInsight Research Centreen_US
dc.description.admin12 month embargo - ACen_US
dc.description.adminUpdate citation details during checkdate report - ACen_US
dc.date.updated2019-08-29T14:42:38Z-
item.grantfulltextembargo_20200831-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Research Collection
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