Book Review: Ian Hendry and Susan Dickson, 'British Overseas Territories Law' (2011, Hart, Oxford)

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Title: Book Review: Ian Hendry and Susan Dickson, 'British Overseas Territories Law' (2011, Hart, Oxford)
Authors: Mohr, Thomas
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11218
Date: Dec-2011
Online since: 2019-11-21T16:22:10Z
Abstract: Contrary to popular belief the sun has not set on the British Empire. The term "Empire" is, of course, no longer considered appropriate and the extent of what was once a vast global entity has been reduced to a few scattered fragments. Nevertheless, once the shadow of night descends on the United Kingdom the sun continues to shine on many of the fourteen overseas territories scattered along sea lanes that once fostered the growth of British influence overseas. Many of these territories lie in forgotten corners of the world that are now extremely difficult to access. They include a series of islands such as Anguilla; Bermuda; British Indian Ocean Territory; Cayman Islands; Falkland Islands; Montserrat; Pitcairn Islands; St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha; South Georgia and South Sandwich Islands; Turks and Caicos Islands; and Virgin Islands.
Type of material: Review
Publisher: Round Hall
Journal: The Irish Jurist
Volume: 46
Start page: 239
End page: 241
Keywords: Commonwealth of NationsConstitutional governmentsLegal history
Other versions: http://www.irishjurist.com/
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Law Research Collection

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