What are the training needs of early career professionals in addiction medicine? A BEME scoping review protocol

Title: What are the training needs of early career professionals in addiction medicine? A BEME scoping review protocol
Authors: Kelly, DamienAdam, AhmedArya, SidharthCullen, WalterKlimas, Janet al.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11311
Date: 19-Jun-2018
Online since: 2020-03-11T09:46:59Z
Abstract: Background: Substance use disorders (SUD) represent a significant social and economic burden globally. Accurate diagnosis and treatment by early career professionals in addiction medicine (ECPAM) fails, in part, due to a lack of training programs targeting this career stage. Prior research has highlighted the need to assess the specific training needs of early career professionals working in this area. Aim: To conduct a scoping review of the literature on the self-reported training needs of ECPAM worldwide. Methods: Medical and education databases will be searched for studies reporting perceived training needs of early career professionals (having completed their training within a five year period at the time of assessment) in addiction medicine. Retrieved citations will be screened and full text articles reviewed for eligibility by two independent reviewers. A third reviewer will arbitrate where there was disagreement. Two reviewers will independently extract data from included studies and conduct a quality appraisal assessment. Importance: Overall, the evidence on the training needs from this review will inform efforts to optimise ECPAM education internationally. Training needs assessment of early career professionals working in the field of addiction medicine is a priority.
Funding Details: European Commission Horizon 2020
Type of material: Review
Publisher: BEME
Keywords: Substance related disordersMedical educationTraining needs assessmentScoping review
Other versions: https://bemecollaboration.org/Reviews+In+Progress/training+needs+of+early+career+professionals+in+addiction+medicine/
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Medicine Research Collection

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