The Impact of a Cognitive Behavioral Pain Management Program on Sleep in Patients with Chronic Pain: Results of a Pilot Study

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Title: The Impact of a Cognitive Behavioral Pain Management Program on Sleep in Patients with Chronic Pain: Results of a Pilot Study
Authors: Blake, CatherineCunningham, Jennifer M.Power, Camillus K.Horan, SheilaSpencer, OrlaFullen, Brona M.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11404
Date: Feb-2016
Online since: 2020-07-03T15:23:10Z
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of a cognitive behavioral pain management program on sleep in patients with chronic pain. DESIGN: Prospective nonrandomized controlled pilot study with evaluations at baseline and 12 weeks.SETTING: Out-patient multidisciplinary cognitive behavioral pain management program in a university teaching hospital.SUBJECTS: Patients with chronic pain who fulfilled the criteria for participation in a cognitive behavioral pain management program.METHODS: Patients assigned to the intervention group (n = 24) completed a 4 week cognitive behavioral pain management program, and were compared with a waiting list control group (n = 22). Assessments for both groups occurred at baseline and two months post cognitive behavioral pain management program. Outcome measures included self-report (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and objective (actigraphy) sleep measures, pain and quality of life measures.RESULTS: Both groups were comparable at baseline, and all had sleep disturbance. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index correlated with only two of the seven objective sleep measures (fragmentation index r = 0.34, P = 0.02, and sleep efficiency percentage r = -0.31, P = 0.04). There was a large treatment effect for cognitive behavioral pain management program group in mean number of wake bouts (d = 0.76), where a significant group*time interaction was also found (P = 0.016), showing that the CBT-PMP group improved significantly more than controls in this sleep variable. CONCLUSIONS: Patients attending a cognitive behavioral pain management program have high prevalence of sleep disturbance, and actigraphy technology was well tolerated by the patients. Preliminary analysis of the impact of a cognitive behavioral pain management program on sleep is promising, and warrants further investigation.
metadata.dc.description.othersponsorship: Pfizer Healthcare Ireland
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Journal: Pain Medicine
Volume: 17
Issue: 2
Start page: 360
End page: 369
Copyright (published version): 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine
Keywords: HumansFollow-up studiesProspective studiesPilot projectsSleepCognitive therapyAdultMiddle agedFemaleMaleActigraphyPain managementChronic painSleep wake disorders
DOI: 10.1111/pme.12903
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Research Collection

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