Wild to domestic and back again: the dynamics of fallow deer management in medieval England (c. 11th-16th century AD)

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Title: Wild to domestic and back again: the dynamics of fallow deer management in medieval England (c. 11th-16th century AD)
Authors: Sykes, NaomiAyton, GemaBowen, FrazerCarden, Ruth F.et al.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11450
Date: 20-Jul-2016
Online since: 2020-07-29T15:06:33Z
Abstract: This paper presents the results of the first comprehensive scientific study of the fallow deer, a non-native species whose medieval-period introduction to Britain transformed the cultural landscape. It brings together data from traditional zooarchaeological analyses with those derived from new ageing techniques as well as the results of a programme of radiocarbon dating, multi-element isotope studies and genetic analyses. These new data are here integrated with historical and landscape evidence to examine changing patterns of fallow deer translocation and management in medieval England between the 11th and 16th century AD.
metadata.dc.description.othersponsorship: Arts and Humanities Research Council (UK)
University of Nottingham
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Journal: STAR: Science & Technology of Archaeological Research
Volume: 2
Issue: 1
Start page: 113
End page: 126
Copyright (published version): 2016 the Authors
Keywords: MedievalParksFallow deerGeneticsIsotope analysisZooarchaeologyDama-Dama-DamaStrontium isotope ratiosInland HalophytesOxygen isotopesBone phosphatePatternsMarinePretreatmentCattle
DOI: 10.1080/20548923.2016.1208027
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Archaeology Research Collection

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