Mirror, mirror on the outflow cavity wall: Near-infrared CO overtone disc emission of the high-mass YSO IRAS 11101-5829

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
2001.00369.pdf9.5 MBAdobe PDFDownload
Title: Mirror, mirror on the outflow cavity wall: Near-infrared CO overtone disc emission of the high-mass YSO IRAS 11101-5829
Authors: Fedriani, RubenCaratti o Garatti, AlessioKoutoulaki, Maria-KalliopiGarcia Lopez, R.Coffey, Deirdreet al.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11544
Date: 21-Jan-2020
Online since: 2020-09-08T13:05:25Z
Abstract: Aims. The inner regions of high-mass protostars are often invisible in the near-infrared, obscured by thick envelopes and discs. We aim to investigate the inner gaseous disc of IRAS 11101-5829 through scattered light from the outflow cavity walls. Methods. We observed the immediate environment of the high-mass young stellar object IRAS 11101-5829 and the closest knots of its jet, HH135-136, with the integral field unit VLT/SINFONI. We also retrieved archival data from the high-resolution long-slit spectrograph VLT/X-shooter. We analysed imaging and spectroscopic observations to discern the nature of the near-infrared CO emission. Results. We detect the first three bandheads of the υ = 2−0 CO vibrational emission for the first time in this object. It is coincident with continuum and Brγ emission and extends up to ~10 000 au to the north-east and ~10 000 au to the south-west. The line profiles have been modelled as a Keplerian rotating disc assuming a single ring in local thermodynamic equilibrium. The model output gives a temperature of ~3000 K, a CO column density of ~1 × 1022 cm−2, and a projected Keplerian velocity vK sin idisc ~ 25 km s−1, which is consistent with previous modelling in other high-mass protostars. In particular, the low value of vK sin idisc suggests that the disc is observed almost face-on, whereas the well-constrained geometry of the jet imposes that the disc must be close to edge-on. This apparent discrepancy is interpreted as the CO seen reflected in the mirror of the outflow cavity wall. Conclusions. From both jet geometry and disc modelling, we conclude that all the CO emission is seen through reflection by the cavity walls and not directly. This result implies that in the case of highly embedded objects, as for many high-mass protostars, line profile modelling alone might be deceptive and the observed emission could affect the derived physical and geometrical properties; in particular the inclination of the system can be incorrectly interpreted.
Funding Details: European Commission Horizon 2020
Irish Research Council
Science Foundation Ireland
University College Dublin
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: EDP Sciences
Journal: Astronomy & Astrophysics
Volume: 633
Copyright (published version): 2020 European Southern Observatory
Keywords: AccretionAccretion discsJets and outflowsProtostarsMassive starsIRAS 11101-5829HH 135-HH 136
DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201936748
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Physics Research Collection

Show full item record

Page view(s)

108
checked on Sep 22, 2020

Download(s)

6
checked on Sep 22, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. For other possible restrictions on use please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.