Self-directed home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in patients with advanced cancer and poor performance status: a feasibility study

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Dominic-
dc.contributor.authorLennon, Olive-
dc.contributor.authorWright, Sarah-
dc.contributor.authorCaulfield, Brian-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-16T11:53:52Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-16T11:53:52Z-
dc.date.copyright2020 the Authorsen_US
dc.date.issued2020-03-16-
dc.identifier.citationSupportive Care in Canceren_US
dc.identifier.issn0941-4355-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/11629-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Concurrent neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) involving sub-tetanic low frequency and tetanic high frequency which targets aerobic and muscular fitness is a potential alternative to conventional exercise in cancer rehabilitation. However, its safety and feasibility in patients with advanced cancer are unknown. The aim of this feasibility study was to determine safety and feasibility and evaluate changes in functional and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) outcomes in individuals with advanced cancer and poor performance status after concurrent NMES. These results should help inform the design of future studies. Methods: Participants with advanced cancer and poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scale ≥ 2) (n = 18) were recruited. The intervention included a novel NMES intervention implemented over a 4-week period. Functional exercise capacity, lower limb muscle endurance and HR-QoL were measured by 6-min walk test (6MWT), 30-s sit-to-stand (30STS) and European Organization for Research and Treatment quality of life questionnaire core-30 (EORTC QLQ C30) pre and post-intervention. Participants unable to complete the 6-min walk test completed the timed up and go test. Participant experience and the impact of the intervention on daily life were investigated through semi-structured interviews. Results: Ten of 18 participants completed the intervention. No adverse events were reported. Seven of 8 participants improved 6MWT performance (2 of 2 improved timed up and go), 8 of 10 participants improved 30STS and 8 of 10 participants improved Global quality of life. Perceived benefits included improved mobility and muscle strength. Conclusions: Neuromuscular electrical stimulation appears safe and feasible in advanced cancer and may improve physical and HR-QoL outcomes. Future prospective trials are warranted to confirm these findings prior to clinical implementation in an advanced cancer setting.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEuropean Commission Horizon 2020en_US
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectOncologyen_US
dc.subjectRehabilitationen_US
dc.subjectNMESen_US
dc.subjectNeuromuscular electrical stimulationen_US
dc.subjectAdvanced canceren_US
dc.subjectSit-to-standen_US
dc.subjectPhysical functionen_US
dc.subjectPhysical activityen_US
dc.subjectExerciseen_US
dc.subjectAdultsen_US
dc.subjectCOPDen_US
dc.titleSelf-directed home-based neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) in patients with advanced cancer and poor performance status: a feasibility studyen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactotherjennifer.kelly@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.startpage5529en_US
dc.identifier.endpage5536en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00520-020-05394-0-
dc.neeo.contributorO'Connor|Dominic|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorLennon|Olive|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorWright|Sarah|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorCaulfield|Brian|aut|-
dc.date.updated2020-10-13T10:48:49Z-
dc.identifier.grantid722012-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextopen-
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