Worker well-being before and during the COVID-19 restrictions: A longitudinal study in the UK

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Title: Worker well-being before and during the COVID-19 restrictions: A longitudinal study in the UK
Authors: Pelly, DianeDaly, MichaelDelaney, LiamDoyle, Orla
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11940
Date: Feb-2021
Online since: 2021-02-12T11:10:26Z
Abstract: The potential impact of COVID-19 restrictions on worker well-being is currently unknown. In this study we examine 15 well-being outcomes collected from 621 full-time workers assessed before (November, 2019 - February, 2020) and during (May-June, 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. Fixed effects analyses are used to investigate how the COVID-19 restrictions and involuntary homeworking affect well-being and job performance. The majority of worker well-being measures are not adversely affected. Homeworkers feel more engaged and autonomous, experience fewer negative emotions and feel more connected to their organisations. However, these improvements come at the expense of reduced homelife satisfaction and job performance.
Funding Details: University College Dublin
Funding Details: UCD Behavioural Science Group
Type of material: Working Paper
Publisher: University College Dublin. School of Economics
Start page: 1
End page: 60
Series/Report no.: UCD Centre for Economic Research Working Paper Series; WP2021/05
Copyright (published version): 2021 the Authors
Keywords: COVID-19 restrictionsWorkersHomeworkingSubjective well-beingProductivityMental healthJob satisfactionEngagement
JEL Codes: J08; J24; I31
Language: en
Status of Item: Not peer reviewed
This item is made available under a Creative Commons License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
Appears in Collections:Economics Working Papers & Policy Papers

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