Athletes with a concussion history in the last two years have impairments in dynamic balance performance

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Title: Athletes with a concussion history in the last two years have impairments in dynamic balance performance
Authors: Johnston, WilliamHeiderscheit, BryanSanfilippo, JenniferBrooks, M. AlisonCaulfield, Brian
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/11949
Date: Aug-2020
Online since: 2021-02-16T15:27:57Z
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to determine if National Collegiate Athletics Association Division 1 American Football and Ice Hockey athletes with a history of concussion have impaired dynamic balance control when compared to healthy control athletes. This cross‐sectional observational study recruited 146 athletes; 90 control athletes and 56 athletes with a history of concussion. Athletes were tested during a pre‐season evaluation using the inertial‐sensor instrumented Y Balance Test. Independent variables were normalized reach distance, gyroscope magnitude sample entropy, and jerk magnitude root mean square. Kruskal‐Wallis H test and Dunn‐Bonferroni analysis demonstrated that individuals with a concussion history within the last 2 years have statistically significantly lower jerk magnitude root mean square in the posteromedial (Z = 23.22, P = .015) and posterolateral (Z = 24.64, P = .010) reach directions, when compared to the control group. There was no significant difference between those who sustained a concussion longer than two years ago and the control group for the posteromedial (Z = −1.25; P = .889) and posterolateral (Z = 6.44; P = .469) directions. These findings show that athletes with a concussion history within the last two years possess dynamic balance deficits, when compared to healthy control athletes. Conversely, athletes whose injury occurred greater than 2 years ago possessed comparable performance to the healthy controls. This suggests that sensorimotor control deficits may persist beyond clinical recovery, for up to 2 years. Therefore, clinicians should integrate balance training interventions into the return‐to‐play process to accelerate sensorimotor recovery and mitigate the risk of future injury.
Funding Details: Science Foundation Ireland
Funding Details: Insight Research Centre
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Wiley
Journal: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Volume: 30
Issue: 8
Start page: 1497
End page: 1505
Copyright (published version): 2020 Wiley
Keywords: Personal sensingMild traumatic brain injuryPhysiotherapyRehabilitationDigital healthWearable sensorBalancePostural
DOI: 10.1111/sms.13691
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
This item is made available under a Creative Commons License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/
Appears in Collections:Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Research Collection
Insight Research Collection

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