The Impact of Victimisation on Subjective Well-Being

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Matthew-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-19T11:29:21Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-19T11:29:21Z-
dc.date.copyright2021 the Authoren_US
dc.date.issued2021-09-
dc.identifier.other202123-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/12564-
dc.description.abstractThis paper uses the UK Household Longitudinal Study to explore the relationship between victimisation and several measures of subjective well-being. Using person fixed effects models, I find that being attacked or insulted both significantly reduce well-being at the mean, with no significant differences between men and women in the effect size. Next, using unconditional quantile regression with fixed effects models, I identify the highly heterogeneous effects of victimisation along the unconditional well-being distribution. The effect of victimisation on subjective wellbeing is monotonically decreasing, with those at ‘worse’ quantiles of the well-being distribution experiencing the largest falls in well-being, and those at the ‘better’ quantiles of the distribution experiencing the smallest falls.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUniversity College Dublin. School of Economicsen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesUCD Centre for Economic Research Working Paper Seriesen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWP2021/23en_US
dc.subjectVictimisationen_US
dc.subjectSubjective well-beingen_US
dc.subject.classificationI31en_US
dc.subject.classificationJ00en_US
dc.subject.classificationJ17en_US
dc.subject.classificationC21en_US
dc.titleThe Impact of Victimisation on Subjective Well-Beingen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.statusNot peer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.startpage1en_US
dc.identifier.endpage82en_US
dc.neeo.contributorShannon|Matthew|aut|-
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/en_US
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Economics Working Papers & Policy Papers
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