Efficacy of Cold Plasma for Direct Deposition of Antibiotics as a Novel Approach for Localized Delivery and Retention of Effect

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLos, Agata-
dc.contributor.authorZiuzina, Dana-
dc.contributor.authorBoehm, Daniela-
dc.contributor.authorBourke, Paula-
dc.contributor.authoret al.-
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-10T16:51:54Z-
dc.date.available2021-11-10T16:51:54Z-
dc.date.copyright2019 the Authorsen_US
dc.date.issued2019-12-20-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiologyen_US
dc.identifier.issn2235-2988-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/12623-
dc.description.abstractAntimicrobial coating of medical devices has emerged as a potentially effective tool to prevent or ameliorate device-related infections. In this study the plasma deposition process for direct deposition of pharmaceutical drugs on to a range of surfaces and the retention of structure function relationship and antimicrobial efficacy against mono-species biofilms were investigated. Two selected sample antibiotics—ampicillin and gentamicin, were deposited onto two types of surfaces—polystyrene microtiter plates and stainless steel coupons. The antimicrobial efficacy of the antibiotic-coated surfaces was tested against challenge populations of both planktonic and sessile Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with responses monitored for up to 14 days. The plasma deposition process bonded the antibiotic to the surfaces, with localized retention of antibiotic activity. The antibiotics deposited on the test surfaces retained a good efficacy against planktonic cells, and importantly prevented biofilm formation of attached cells for up to 96 h. The antibiotic rapidly eluted from the surface of antibiotic-coated surfaces to the surrounding medium, with retention of effect in this surrounding milieu for up to 2 weeks. Control experiments established that there was no independent antimicrobial or growth promoting effect of the plasma deposition process, where there was no antibiotic in the helium plasma assisted delivery stream. Apart from the flexibility offered through deposition on material surfaces, there was no additive or destructive effect associated with the helium assisted plasma deposition process on the antibiotic. The plasma assisted process was a viable mean of coating clinically relevant materials and developing innovative functional materials with retention of antibiotic activity, without employing a linker or plasma modified polymer, thus minimizing bio-compatibility issues for medical device materials. This offers potential to prevent or control instrumented or non-permanent device associated infection localized to the surgical or implant site.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipEnterprise Irelanden_US
dc.description.sponsorshipScience Foundation Irelanden_US
dc.format.mediumElectronic-eCollection-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner(s) are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.en_US
dc.subjectBiofilmsen_US
dc.subjectPseudomonas aeruginosaen_US
dc.subjectEscherichia colien_US
dc.subjectAmpicillinen_US
dc.subjectGentamicinsen_US
dc.subjectAnti-bacterial agentsen_US
dc.subjectDrug delivery systemsen_US
dc.subjectMicrobial sensitivity testsen_US
dc.subjectEquipment and suppliesen_US
dc.subjectSurface propertiesen_US
dc.subjectPlasma gasesen_US
dc.titleEfficacy of Cold Plasma for Direct Deposition of Antibiotics as a Novel Approach for Localized Delivery and Retention of Effecten_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactotherpaula.bourke@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.citation.otherArticle Number: 428en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcimb.2019.00428-
dc.neeo.contributorLos|Agata|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorZiuzina|Dana|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorBoehm|Daniela|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorBourke|Paula|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributoret al.||aut|-
dc.date.updated2020-09-21T21:07:23Z-
dc.identifier.grantidIP/2016/0516/Y-
dc.identifier.grantidSFI/16/BBSRC/3391-
dc.identifier.grantidBB/P008496/1-
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ie/en_US
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextopen-
Appears in Collections:Biosystems and Food Engineering Research Collection
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