What drives passion? An empirical examination on the impact of personality trait interactions and job environments on work passion

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKreil, Annika-
dc.contributor.authorTumasjan, Andranik-
dc.contributor.authorYasseri, Taha-
dc.contributor.authorWelpe, Isabell-
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-11T12:09:57Z-
dc.date.available2022-01-11T12:09:57Z-
dc.date.issued2021-01-06-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/12711-
dc.description.abstractPassionate employees are essential for organisational success as they foster higher performance and exhibit lower turnover or absenteeism. While a large body of research has investigated the consequences of passion, we know only little about its antecedents. Integrating trait interaction theory with trait activation theory, this paper examines how personality traits, i.e. conscientiousness, agreeableness, and neuroticism impact passion at work across different job situations. Passion has been conceptualized as a two-dimensional construct, consisting of harmonious work passion (HWP) and obsessive work passion (OWP). Our study is based on a sample of N = 824 participants from the myPersonality project. We find a positive relationship between neuroticism and OWP in enterprising environments. Further, we find a three-way interaction between conscientiousness, agreeableness, and enterprising environment in predicting OWP. Our findings imply that the impact of personality configurations on different forms of passion is contingent on the job environment. Moreover, in line with self-regulation theory, the results reveal agreeableness as a "cool influencer" and neuroticism as a "hot influencer" of the relationship between conscientiousness and work passion. We derive practical implications for organisations on how to foster work passion, particularly HWP, in organisations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.subjectBig Fiveen_US
dc.subjectWork passionen_US
dc.subjectTrait interactionen_US
dc.subjectTrait activationen_US
dc.subjectSelf-regulationen_US
dc.titleWhat drives passion? An empirical examination on the impact of personality trait interactions and job environments on work passionen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactothertaha.yasseri@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusNot peer revieweden_US
dc.check.date2022-04-04-
dc.neeo.contributorKreil|Annika|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorTumasjan|Andranik|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorYasseri|Taha|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorWelpe|Isabell|aut|-
dc.description.othersponsorshipAlan Turing Instituteen_US
dc.description.adminCheck for published version during checkdate report - RORen_US
dc.description.admin2022-01-11 JG: arXiv record states to be published in Current Psychology (Springer) https://link.springer.com/journal/12144/volumes-and-issuesen_US
dc.date.updated2021-10-03T14:56:58Z-
dc.identifier.grantidEP/N510129/1-
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/ie/en_US
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Sociology Research Collection
Geary Institute Research Collection
Files in This Item:
 File SizeFormat
Download2101.01270.pdf700.86 kBAdobe PDF
Show simple item record

Page view(s)

172
Last Week
2
Last month
16
checked on May 16, 2022

Download(s)

26
checked on May 16, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


If you are a publisher or author and have copyright concerns for any item, please email research.repository@ucd.ie and the item will be withdrawn immediately. The author or person responsible for depositing the article will be contacted within one business day.