Controversy around climate change reports: a case study of Twitter responses to the 2019 IPCC report on land

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSanford, Mary-
dc.contributor.authorPainter, James-
dc.contributor.authorYasseri, Taha-
dc.contributor.authorLorimer, Jamie-
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-11T12:34:45Z-
dc.date.available2022-01-11T12:34:45Z-
dc.date.copyright2021 the Authorsen_US
dc.date.issued2021-08-31-
dc.identifier.citationClimatic Changeen_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-0009-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/12713-
dc.description.abstractIn August 2019, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its Special Report on Climate Change and Land (SRCCL), which generated extensive societal debate and interest in mainstream and social media. Using computational and conceptual text analysis, we examined more than 6,000 English-language posts on Twitter to establish the relative presence of different topics. Then, we assessed their levels of toxicity and sentiment polarity as an indication of contention and controversy. We find first that meat consumption and dietary options became one of the most discussed issues on Twitter in response to the IPCC report, even though it was a relatively minor element of the report; second, this new issue of controversy (meat and diet) had similar, high levels of toxicity to strongly contentious issues in previous IPCC reports (skepticism about climate science and the credibility of the IPCC). We suggest that this is in part a reflection of increasingly polarized narratives about meat and diet found in other areas of public discussion and of a movement away from criticism of climate science towards criticism of climate solutions. Finally, we discuss the possible implications of these findings for the work of the IPCC in anticipating responses to its reports and responding to them effectively.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trusten_US
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronic-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSpringeren_US
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectIPCCen_US
dc.subjectTwitteren_US
dc.subjectDieten_US
dc.subjectContentionen_US
dc.subjectContent analysisen_US
dc.titleControversy around climate change reports: a case study of Twitter responses to the 2019 IPCC report on landen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactothertaha.yasseri@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume167en_US
dc.identifier.issue3-4en_US
dc.citation.otherArticle Number: 59en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10584-021-03182-1-
dc.neeo.contributorSanford|Mary|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorPainter|James|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorYasseri|Taha|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorLorimer|Jamie|aut|-
dc.description.othersponsorshipEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Councilen_US
dc.description.othersponsorshipAlan Turing Instituteen_US
dc.date.updated2021-12-02T18:32:37Z-
dc.identifier.grantidEP/N510129/1-
dc.identifier.grantid205212/Z/16/Z-
dc.identifier.grantidEP/N510129/1-
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ie/en_US
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
item.grantfulltextopen-
Appears in Collections:Sociology Research Collection
Geary Institute Research Collection
Climate Change Collection
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