The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health and the provision of Care in Paediatric Emergency Departments: a qualitative study of frontline emergency care staff

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorConlon, Ciara-
dc.contributor.authorMcDonnell, Thérèse-
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Michael-
dc.contributor.authorMcAuliffe, Eilish-
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, Emma-
dc.contributor.authoret al.-
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-17T15:07:00Z-
dc.date.available2022-01-17T15:07:00Z-
dc.date.copyright2021 the Authorsen_US
dc.date.issued2021-03-25-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Health Services Researchen_US
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/12739-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent public health guidance to reduce the spread of the disease have wide-reaching implications for children’s health and wellbeing. Furthermore, paediatric emergency departments (EDs) have rapidly adapted provision of care in response to the pandemic. This qualitative study utilized insight from multidisciplinary frontline staff to understand 1) the changes in paediatric emergency healthcare utilization during COVID-19 2) the experiences of working within the restructured health system. Methods: Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with frontline staff working in two paediatric EDs and two mixed adult and children EDs. Participants included emergency medicine clinicians (n = 5), nursing managerial staff (n = 6), social workers (n = 2) and nursing staff (n = 2). Thematic Analysis (TA) was applied to the data to identify key themes. Results: The pandemic and public health restrictions have had an adverse impact on children’s health and psychosocial wellbeing, compounded by difficulty in accessing primary and community services. The impact may have been more acute for children with disabilities and chronic health conditions and has raised child protection issues for vulnerable children. EDs have shown innovation and agility in the structural and operational changes they have implemented to continue to deliver care to children, however resource limitations and other challenges must be addressed to ensure high quality care delivery and protect the wellbeing of those tasked with delivering this care. Conclusions: The spread of COVID-19 and subsequent policies to address the pandemic has had wide-reaching implications for children’s health and wellbeing. The interruption to health and social care services is manifesting in myriad ways in the ED, such as a rise in psychosocial presentations. As the pandemic continues to progress, policy makers and service providers must ensure the continued provision of essential health and social services, including targeted responses for those with existing conditions.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipHealth Research Boarden_US
dc.format.mediumElectronic-
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_US
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.en_US
dc.subjectHumansen_US
dc.subjectPediatricsen_US
dc.subjectQuarantineen_US
dc.subjectQualitative researchen_US
dc.subjectAdulten_US
dc.subjectChilden_US
dc.subjectHealth personnelen_US
dc.subjectHospital emergency serviceen_US
dc.subjectInterviews as topicen_US
dc.subjectPandemicsen_US
dc.subjectChild healthen_US
dc.subjectCOVID-19en_US
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2en_US
dc.subjectCoronavirusen_US
dc.titleThe impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on child health and the provision of Care in Paediatric Emergency Departments: a qualitative study of frontline emergency care staffen_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.internal.authorcontactothertherese.mcdonnell@ucd.ieen_US
dc.statusPeer revieweden_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.citation.otherArticle Number: 279en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12913-021-06284-9-
dc.neeo.contributorConlon|Ciara|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorMcDonnell|Thérèse|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorBarrett|Michael|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorMcAuliffe|Eilish|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorNicholson|Emma|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributoret al.||aut|-
dc.date.updated2022-01-09T13:53:08Z-
dc.identifier.grantidCOV19-2020-076-
dc.rights.licensehttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ie/en_US
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
Appears in Collections:Nursing, Midwifery & Health Systems Research Collection
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