Trends in estimated intramammary antimicrobial usage in the Irish dairy industry from 2003 to 2019

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Title: Trends in estimated intramammary antimicrobial usage in the Irish dairy industry from 2003 to 2019
Authors: McAloon, Catherine I.McCoy, FinolaMore, Simon John
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/13099
Date: 16-Sep-2021
Online since: 2022-08-29T14:21:02Z
Abstract: The objective of this study is to update earlier work on intramammary (IM) antimicrobial (AM) usage in Ireland. There is a need to measure AM usage in food-producing animals given increasing societal concerns about AM resistance as well as recent regulatory changes that dictate changes in how AM are used in food-producing animals and how AM sales and usage are recorded. National sales data were collected and used in this analysis. Sales of the number of IM AM tubes and amount of active ingredient sold were analyzed each year by product type [in-lactation (LC) therapy and dry cow (DC) therapy] and classification system (World Health Organization and more recent European Medicine Agency). Descriptive trends in estimated IM AM use are presented, including defined course dose (DCDvet; a technical unit for on-farm usage). There has been a decrease in estimated on-farm usage of IM AM during lactation, from 0.48 DCDvet/cow per year in 2015 to 0.43 DCDvet/cow per year in 2019. Almost all LC therapies sold include critically important AM (CIA), with 98% of the total DCDvet administered for LC therapy in 2019 containing at least 1 CIA. There has been a slow increase in tubes containing at least 1 highest priority CIA in LC therapies, from 0.01 DCDvet/cow per year in 2003, accounting for 2% of the total DCDvet administered for LC therapy, to 0.03 DCDvet/cow per year in 2019, accounting for 7% of the total DCDvet administered for LC use. The estimated usage of IM AM DC therapy has decreased from 1.09 DCDvet/cow per year in 2015 to 0.95 DCDvet/cow per year in 2019. In the last 5 yr, more than 40% of the total DC DCDvet administered contained at least 1 CIA, and there has been an increase in recent years in the percentage of the total DC DCDvet administered that contains at least 1 highest priority CIA, driven mainly by use of fourth-generation cephalosporin. This work provides further insights into IM AM usage in Ireland and highlights some important areas for attention, including availability of farm-level usage data, prescribing practices, and usage of important AM.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: American Dairy Science Association
Journal: JDS Communications
Volume: 2
Issue: 5
End page: 271
Copyright (published version): 2021 the Authors
Keywords: Antimicrobial therapyPrescribing practicesIreland
DOI: 10.3168/jdsc.2021-0081
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
ISSN: 2666-9102
This item is made available under a Creative Commons License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ie/
Appears in Collections:Veterinary Medicine Research Collection

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