Europeanisation and hyphe-nation : renegotiating the identity boundaries of Europe’s western isles

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Title: Europeanisation and hyphe-nation : renegotiating the identity boundaries of Europe’s western isles
Authors: Hayward, Katy
Howard, Kevin
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/2197
Date: 2002
Abstract: This paper explores the feasibility and plausibility of the emergence of an Irish-British form of identification. We examine the possibility of such a hyphenated identity category in the context of those who consider themselves to be Irish whilst residing under the jurisdiction of the British state. The key developments in official recognition of new forms of identification in the Western Isles that may point to the emergence of an Irish-British identity are the inclusion of an “Irish” category in the 2001 British censuses and the recognition of a dual Irish and British identity as part of the Belfast Agreement in 1998. We examine these developments and assess the degree to which they support the notion of hyphenated identities. Our assessment draws a comparison between the meaning of identification in the European context and that of the United States of America and concludes that the continued dominance of territorially-defined national identities in Europe precludes the development of a hyphenated Irish-British identification along the lines of those prevalent in the USA.
Funding Details: Not applicable
Type of material: Working Paper
Publisher: University College Dublin. Institute for British-Irish Studies
Series/Report no.: IBIS Working Papers; 18
Copyright (published version): The authors, 2002
Keywords: EuropeanisationIdentityIrishBritish
Subject LCSH: National characteristics, Irish
National characteristics, British
Cultural fusion--Great Britain
Irish--Great Britain
Other versions: http://www.ucd.ie/ibis/filestore/wp2002/18_khkh.pdf
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Conference Details: Revised version of a paper presented at the Conference of the European Federa-tion of Associations and Centres of Irish Studies, Aarhus, Denmark, 6 December 2001.
Appears in Collections:Institute for British-Irish Studies (IBIS) Working Papers and Policy Papers

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