The physiological effects of low level electrical stimulation on short term recovery from supra maximal exercise bouts : a case study

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
Malone J et al, Acute Abstract.doc137 kBMicrosoft WordDownload
Title: The physiological effects of low level electrical stimulation on short term recovery from supra maximal exercise bouts : a case study
Authors: Malone, John
Coughlan, Garrett
Crowe, Louis
Caulfield, Brian
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/2397
Date: Apr-2010
Abstract: Inadequate recovery from short-term, high-intensity bouts of exercise can be a limiting factor to optimal sporting performance [1]. Previous research investigating recovery from intense exercise using various intervention protocols (e.g., active recovery, massage, cold and contrast water therapy, compression suits etc.) have generally found positive results when compared to passive recovery [2,3]. A recent study utilised electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) as an intervention for short-term recovery (< 1 hr) between bouts of intense exercise [4]. They concluded that EMS shows promise as an alternate recovery treatment for lowering blood lactate when compared to passive recovery.
Funding Details: Not applicable
Type of material: Conference Publication
Keywords: EMSElectrical muscle stimulationShort term recovery
Subject LCSH: Electric stimulation--Physiological aspects
Exercise--Physiological aspects
Physical fitness
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Conference Details: Poster presentation at 1st Annual Conference of the International Functional Electrical Stimulation Society (UK and Ireland Chapter), Salford, U.K., 15-16 April, 2010
Appears in Collections:CLARITY Research Collection
Computer Science Research Collection
Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science Research Collection

Show full item record

Page view(s) 5

338
checked on May 25, 2018

Download(s) 10

951
checked on May 25, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. For other possible restrictions on use please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.