What did abolishing university fees in Ireland do?

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Title: What did abolishing university fees in Ireland do?
Authors: Denny, Kevin
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/2648
Date: 20-May-2010
Abstract: University tuition fees for undergraduates were abolished in Ireland in 1996. This paper examines the effect of this reform on the socioeconomic gradient (SES) to determine whether the reform was successful in achieving its objective of promoting educational equality. It finds that the reform clearly did not have that effect. It is also shown that the university/SES gradient can be explained by differential performance at second level which also explains the gap between the sexes. Students from white collar backgrounds do significantly better in their final second level exams than the children of blue‐collar workers. The results are very similar to recent findings for the UK. I also find that certain demographic characteristics have large negative effects on school performance i.e. having a disabled or deceased parent. The results show that the effect of SES on school performance is generally stronger for those at the lower end of the conditional distribution of academic attainment.
Funding Details: Not applicable
Type of material: Working Paper
Publisher: University College Dublin. School of Economics
Keywords: Tuition costs;University;Fees;Socio‐economic background;Educational attainment
Subject LCSH: Education, Higher--Finance--Ireland
College costs--Ireland
Educational equalization--Ireland
Educational attainment--Ireland
Language: en
Status of Item: Not peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Geary Institute Working Papers
Economics Working Papers & Policy Papers

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