Thromboxane A2 signalling in humans : a ‘tail’ of two receptors

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Title: Thromboxane A2 signalling in humans : a ‘tail’ of two receptors
Authors: Kinsella, B. Therese
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/3147
Date: 2001
Abstract: Since its discovery in 1975, we now have a wealth of knowledge relating to the biochemical, pharmacological and physiologic actions of thromboxane (TX) A2 and its related metabolites. These molecular insights have been greatly expedited by the molecular cloning and characterisation of a complementary (c) DNA for the human TXA receptor, now termed T Prostanoid or TP receptor, from a megakaryocytic / placental cDNA library in 1991 and later through the discovery of a cDNA encoding a second isoform of the human TP receptor in 1994. The requirement for two TP receptors in primates, but not in other species thus far investigated, is unclear but points to potential species-specific physiologic differences. In this review, I will describe some recent advances in the research field of TXA2/TP receptor signalling, focussing particularly on studies pertaining to the human TP receptor isoforms.
Funding Details: Health Research Board
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Portland Press
Copyright (published version): 2001 Biochemical Society
Keywords: Thromboxane;Receptor;Prostanoids;Signalling;Desensitisation
Subject LCSH: Thromboxanes--Research
Prostanoids--Research
DOI: 10.1042/bst0290641
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Conway Institute Research Collection
Biomolecular and Biomedical Science Research Collection

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