Invisible Farmers: the Role of Irish Women in the National Farmers’ Association, Farmers’ Rights Campaign of the 1960s.

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Title: Invisible Farmers: the Role of Irish Women in the National Farmers’ Association, Farmers’ Rights Campaign of the 1960s.
Authors: Gibbons, Mary
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/3900
Date: Sep-2012
Abstract: This article examines the role of Irish farmwomen during the National Farmers’ Association, Farmers’ Rights Campaign, which took place in 1966-67. It shows the “invisible” role that these women played during this campaign. These women illustrate the notion of “love labour”, which seeks to disguise the true value of their contribution by presenting it as an act of love rather than attributing to it the true value of work. It shows how these farmwomen diminish their own role during the campaign as secondary to that of their husbands. This article addresses the importance of having a gender perspective to analyse historical phenomena; the emergence of social movements; and highlights the role of religion in the lives of Irish farming people at that time.
Funding Details: Not applicable
Type of material: Working Paper
Publisher: University College Dublin. School of Social Justice. Women's Studies
Keywords: Farmers' Rights Campaign;Feminism;Ireland;Irish farmwomen;Invisible farmers;Love labour;Women
Subject LCSH: Women in agriculture--Ireland
Demonstrations--Irelands
Sex role--Ireland
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Women and Gender Studies Series

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