Does home ownership vary by sexual orientation?

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Title: Does home ownership vary by sexual orientation?
Authors: Jepsen, Christopher
Jepsen, Lisa K.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/4437
Date: May-2009
Abstract: The housing literature considers whether the probability of owning a home is different for ethnic and racial minorities than for native whites. Most studies find that minorities are less likely to own a home than their white counterparts. A logical extension of this line of research is to consider whether home-ownership rates differ based on sexual orientation. We use data on couples from the 2000 Census and find that same-sex couples are less likely to own a home than are married couples. The average value of houses owned by same-sex male couples is statistically similar to the average value of houses owned by married couples, but houses owned by same-sex female and cohabiting couples have lower average values than those owned by married couples. Conditional on owning, same-sex couples are slightly less likely to have a mortgage compared to married couples.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Copyright (published version): 2008 Elsevier B.V.
Keywords: Home ownership;Housing demand;Same-sex couples;Marriage
DOI: 10.1016/j.regsciurbeco.2008.11.002
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Geary Institute Research Collection
Economics Research Collection

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