Psychosocial Interventions for Alcohol use among problem drug users (PINTA) : protocol for a feasibility study in primary care

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Title: Psychosocial Interventions for Alcohol use among problem drug users (PINTA) : protocol for a feasibility study in primary care
Authors: Klimas, Jan
Anderson, Rolande
Bourke, Margaret
Bury, Gerard
Field, Catherine Anne
et al.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/4522
Date: Aug-2013
Abstract: Background: Alcohol use is an important issue among problem drug users. Although screening and brief intervention are effective in reducing problem alcohol use in primary care, no research has examined this issue among problem drug users. Objectives: To determine if a complex intervention, incorporating screening and brief intervention for problem alcohol use among problem drug users, is feasible and acceptable in practice and effective in reducing the proportion of patients with problem alcohol use. Methods: PINTA is a pilot feasibility study of a complex intervention comprising screening and brief intervention for problem alcohol use among problem drug users with cluster randomisation at the level of general practice, integrated qualitative process evaluation, and involving general practices in two socioeconomically deprived regions. Participants: Practices (N=16) will be eligible to participate if they are registered to prescribe methadone and/or at least 10 patients of the practice are currently receiving addiction-treatment. Patient inclusion criteria are: aged 18 or over and receiving addiction treatment / care (e.g.methadone) or known to be a problem drug user. Interventions: A complex intervention, supporting screening and brief intervention for problem alcohol use among problem drug users (experimental group) compared to an 'assessment only' control group. A delayed intervention being available to 'control' practices after follow up. Outcome: Primary outcomes are feasibility and acceptability of the intervention to patients andprofessionals. Secondary outcome is the effectiveness of the intervention on care process (documented rates of screening and brief intervention) and outcome (proportion of patients with problem alcohol use at the follow up). Randomisation: Stratified random sampling of general practices based on level of training in providing addiction-related care and geographical area. Blinding: Single-blinded; GPs and practice staff, researchers and trainers will not be blinded, but patients and remote randomisers will. Discussion: This is the first study to examine feasibility and acceptability of primary care based complex intervention to enhance alcohol screening and brief intervention among problem drug users. Results will inform future research among this high-risk population and guide policy and service development locally and internationally.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: JMIR
Keywords: Complex interventionScreeningBrief interventionAlcoholMethadone maintenancePrimary health careGeneral practiceSubstance-related disorders
Other versions: http://www.researchprotocols.org/2013/2/e26/
Language: en
Status of Item: Not peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Medicine Research Collection

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