Clinical psychology in Ireland: a national survey.

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Title: Clinical psychology in Ireland: a national survey.
Authors: Carr, Alan
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/5457
Date: 1995
Abstract: The results of a 1993 survey of 111 clinical psychologists practising in Ireland are presented in this paper. Fifty-five percent of respondents were female and 45% were male with a mean age of 39 years and 7 months. A third of the group had a two year masters degree in clinical psychology; a third had on-the-job training; and a third had a diploma, doctorate or one-year masters degree in clinical psychology. Respondents had a mean of 13 years clinical experience and an average of 3 previous jobs in clinical psychology. Half the sample were employed in voluntary organizations and just over a quarter were employed by health boards in the special hospitals or community care programmes. Thirty-one percent worked in child and family specialty, 30% in mental handicap and 23% in adult mental health. Forty-one percent were senior grade, 23% were basic grade and 19% identified themselves as service directors or consultants. Eighty-seven percent worked full-time and adopted complex roles involving up to 11 different activities including treatment (27%), assessment (20%), staff training (8%), research (6%), service planning (5%) and preventative education (3%). The median case load was 51; the average waiting list was three months; and it contained 22 cases. Cognitive behavioural (55%) and family systems (29%) were the most common theoretical models. Two thirds (366/527) of the research projects conducted were completed by 32 of the 111 psychologists surveyed. Sixty-one of the 111 respondents conducted some private practice but only 6 were in full-time private practice. Two thirds reported high levels of job satisfaction. All were involved in one or more of 11 continuing professional development activities to which employers contributed less than 50% of the costs. The results are discussed in the light of similar surveys conducted in the US and the UK. Implications for the profession are also considered.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Copyright (published version): 1995 Taylor & Francis
Keywords: Clinical psychologists;Continuing professional development;Professionals
DOI: 10.1080/03033910.1995.10558038
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Psychology Research Collection

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