National survey of psychiatrists' responses to implementation of the Mental Health Act 2001 in Ireland

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJabbar, Faraz-
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Brendan D.-
dc.contributor.authorCasey, Patricia R.-
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-07T08:19:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-10-07T08:19:13Z-
dc.date.copyright2009 Royal Academy of Medicine in Irelanden
dc.date.issued2010-06-
dc.identifier.citationIrish Journal of Medical Scienceen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10197/6012-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Ireland’s Mental Health Act 2001 resulted in substantial changes to mental health services and the process of involuntary admission. Aims: To determine the views of Irish psychiatrists regarding the new legislation, 1 year after full implementation. Methods: We sent questionnaires to all 735 members of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in Ireland. Results: The response rate was 43.7%. As much as 84% of respondents reported satisfaction with training; 69.1% reported increased workloads; 26.8% reported decreased time with service-users; 40.7% reported changes in relationships with service-users (e.g. increased empathy, but more legalistic, conflicted relationships). Almost one in three (27.4%) stated that it was not feasible to implement the Mental Health Act. Negative comments highlighted the adversarial nature of mental health tribunals, effects on therapeutic relationships and issues related to children. Conclusions: The implementation of the Mental Health Act 2001 has resulted in increased workloads, more conflicted relationships with service-users and adversarial mental health tribunals.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer for the Royal Academy of Medicine in Irelanden
dc.rightsThe final publication is available at www.springerlink.comen
dc.subjectMental health servicesen
dc.subjectPsychiatric hospitalsen
dc.subjectHealth resourcesen
dc.subjectHealth-care reformen
dc.subjectIrelanden
dc.subjectMedical legislationen
dc.titleNational survey of psychiatrists' responses to implementation of the Mental Health Act 2001 in Irelanden
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.internal.authorcontactotherapsych@mater.ie-
dc.internal.availabilityFull text availableen
dc.statusPeer revieweden
dc.identifier.volume179en
dc.identifier.issue2en
dc.identifier.startpage291en
dc.identifier.endpage294en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11845-009-0320-x-
dc.neeo.contributorJabbar|Faraz|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorKelly|Brendan D.|aut|-
dc.neeo.contributorCasey|Patricia R.|aut|-
dc.internal.rmsid189449019-
dc.date.updated2014-08-19T15:06:06Z-
item.grantfulltextopen-
item.fulltextWith Fulltext-
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This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. For other possible restrictions on use please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.