The Fusarium Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Can Inhibit Plant Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
diamond_et_al_.pdf2.42 MBAdobe PDFDownload
Title: The Fusarium Mycotoxin Deoxynivalenol Can Inhibit Plant Apoptosis-Like Programmed Cell Death
Authors: Diamond, Mark
Reape, Theresa J.
Rocha, Olga
Doyle, Siamsa M.
Kacprzyk, Joanna
Doohan, Fiona
McCabe, Paul F.
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/6128
Date: 26-Jul-2013
Abstract: The Fusarium genus of fungi is responsible for commercially devastating crop diseases and the contamination of cereals with harmful mycotoxins. Fusarium mycotoxins aid infection, establishment, and spread of the fungus within the host plant. We investigated the effects of the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) on the viability of Arabidopsis cells. Although it is known to trigger apoptosis in animal cells, DON treatment at low concentrations surprisingly did not kill these cells. On the contrary, we found that DON inhibited apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD) in Arabidopsis cells subjected to abiotic stress treatment in a manner independent of mitochondrial cytochrome c release. This suggested that Fusarium may utilise mycotoxins to suppress plant apoptosis-like PCD. To test this, we infected Arabidopsis cells with a wild type and a DON-minus mutant strain of F. graminearum and found that only the DON producing strain could inhibit death induced by heat treatment. These results indicate that mycotoxins may be capable of disarming plant apoptosis-like PCD and thereby suggest a novel way that some fungi can influence plant cell fate.                         
Funding Details: Science Foundation Ireland
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Journal: PLoS ONE
Volume: 8
Issue: 7
Start page: e6954
Copyright (published version): 2013 the Authors
Keywords: ApoptosisArabidopsis thalianaCell culturesFungal diseasesFungiFusariumHeat treatmentMitochondria
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0069542
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Biology & Environmental Science Research Collection

Show full item record

SCOPUSTM   
Citations 10

25
Last Week
0
Last month
checked on Oct 11, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


This item is available under the Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Ireland. No item may be reproduced for commercial purposes. For other possible restrictions on use please refer to the publisher's URL where this is made available, or to notes contained in the item itself. Other terms may apply.