Effect of Water Consumption and Feeding Method on Soil Nutrient Levels and on Tomato Fruit Yield and Composition

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Title: Effect of Water Consumption and Feeding Method on Soil Nutrient Levels and on Tomato Fruit Yield and Composition
Authors: Gormley, T. R. (Thomas Ronan)
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/6951
Date: 1972
Abstract: Trickle feeding and irrigation of spring and autumn crop tomatoes grown in peat gave a lower soil pH and higher soil specific conductivity (SC) and K content than did feeding by hose or low-level sprayline methods. The use of hard water for making up feed and for irrigating gave a higher soil pH and SC than did moderately soft water. The trickle system gave the tallest plants in the autumn crop. In the spring crop plants were taller initially with the trickle system but the sprayline system gave the tallest plants later on. Hard water decreased height in both crops. Plants fed and irrigated with hard water yielded more marketable fruit in the spring crop than those treated with moderately soft water. The trickle system gave highest yields in both crops, and reduced the incidence of blossom-end rot in the spring crop. Values for fruit acidity, percentage soluble solids and K were lower in trickle-fed tomatoes, but water type had little effect on fruit composition.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: An Foras TalĂșntais
Keywords: Trickle feeding;Specific conductivity;Soil pH
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Agriculture and Food Science Research Collection

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