Is migration from Central and Eastern Europe an opportunity for trade unions to demand higher wages? Evidence from the Romanian health sector

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Title: Is migration from Central and Eastern Europe an opportunity for trade unions to demand higher wages? Evidence from the Romanian health sector
Authors: Stan, Sabin
Erne, Roland
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/7196
Date: 1-Jun-2016
Abstract: Industrial relations scholars have argued that east-west labour migration may benefit trade unions in Central and Eastern Europe. By focusing on the distributional aspect of wage policies adopted by two competing Romanian trade unions in the healthcare sector, this article challenges the assumption of a virtuous link between migration, labour shortages and collective wage increases. We show that migration may also displace collective and egalitarian wage policies in favour of individual and marketized ones that put workers in competition with one another. Thus, the question is not so much whether migration leads to wage increases in sending countries, but whether trade unions' wage demands in response to outward migration consolidate collective solidarity and coordination in wage policy-making or support its individualization and commodification.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Sage Publications
Journal: European Journal of Industrial Relations
Issue: 2
Start page: 167
End page: 183
Copyright (published version): 2015 the Authors
Keywords: Collective bargainingRomaniaHealthcareMigrationTrade unionsWage distributionWage equality
DOI: 10.1177/0959680115610724
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
metadata.dc.date.available: 2015-11-10T14:36:46Z
Appears in Collections:Business Research Collection

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