Promissories and pharmaceutical patents: agencing markets through public narratives

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Title: Promissories and pharmaceutical patents: agencing markets through public narratives
Authors: Geiger, Susi
Finch, John
Permanent link: http://hdl.handle.net/10197/7342
Date: 25-Jul-2015
Abstract: We investigate a body of data emanating from the 2008/2009 EU Pharmaceutical Sector Inquiry, interpreting the collection of submissions to it as a concerted attempt at market innovation that becomes fraught with challenge and contest. In the pharmaceutical market, interests associated with patient concerns, government budgets, global 'Big Pharma,' and local 'small pharma' coalesce and compete with patent law, technological innovation and drug lifecycles. Our research question is: What role do market narratives play in shaping the market's socio-technical agencements? By introducing market narratives, we focus on the performative effects of temporality and iteration. Our argument is that by acting as (contested) promissories, market narratives contribute to 'agencing' a market, such that actors are engaged continually in juxtaposing and adjusting their representations of it and putting in place those socio-technical agencements that make the markets resemble those narratives. Narrating a market becomes a collective and iterative task of equipping actors to shape the markets that they desire.
Type of material: Journal Article
Publisher: Taylor and Francis
Copyright (published version): 2015 Taylor and Francis
Keywords: Market agencement;Performativity;Promissory;Market representations;Narrative;Sector inquiry;Pharmaceutical industry;Market studies
DOI: 10.1080/10253866.2015.1067199
Language: en
Status of Item: Peer reviewed
Appears in Collections:Business Research Collection

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